Perodua Myvi 2022 Facelift

  • 2022 Perodua Myvi GearUp – live gallery of Ace bodykit, seats for facelift; cabin lighting; accessories

    Here’s a live gallery of the 2022 Perodua Myvi kitted up with GearUp accessories, including the Ace bodykit. All the options are affixed to a white 1.5 H variant, the one just below the range-topping AV. Fierce, right?

    The latest Myvi’s facelift is a neat one, cleaner than the original third-gen Myvi as it does away with the sizeable fog lamp housings in favour of vertical LED daytime running light strips (or plain trim) placed at the extreme ends of the bumper. If that’s too simple for you, the Ace kit solves the issue with a heavy hand, “blackening” the open areas with an add-on piece. It envelops the LED DRLs and gives the visual impression of huge air intakes.

    Those black bits extend to the protruding front lip, which replaces the silver strip on the standard car and has the usual metallic “GearUp Perodua Originals” logo in the middle. The black bumper is broken up by body coloured “fangs” to complete an aggressive X face. The side skirts are in a matching two-tone style that’s mostly in black.

    Compared to the front, the Ace kit’s rear end isn’t as fierce. The Myvi’s simple rear spoiler is replaced by a significantly larger wing that’s more protruding at the sides. It’s two-tone (black on the underside) and very prominent, but doesn’t have Proton-style holes in them.

    The lower part of the rear bumper gets extensions to match the front and sides, and the middle section gets a diffuser in black. Like the front piece, there’s a GearUp logo in the middle. This white example also wears door visors that were offered from launch.

    The five-piece Ace bodykit is priced at RM2,500, inclusive of labour and SST. The kit can be matched to all six colours and variants, but note that unlike the Ativa’s GearUp kit, it does not come with LED DRLs – the DRLs you see here are standard with the H and AV variants.

    This example also comes with Ace seat covers. The PVC covers are in black, with the frame of the seat and some stitching in red. There are also small carbon fibre-style panels and the front chairs have embossed Myvi logos. Perodua says that the seat covers are soft but durable, and are easy to clean. It is also tested for side airbag deployment and does not affect Isofix functions. The RM745 set is only for G, X and H variants – the AV already has leather seats and is excluded, so there’s no GearUp fix if you’re allergic to red.

    Also seen here are the LED illuminated scuff plates (RM260 for a set of four), red floor lighting (front and rear, RM240) and a dashcam (RM500). The latter has full HD 1080p resolution at 2.0MP (30 fps) and is WiFi enabled for live viewing on a smartphone. It boasts “high quality night recording with Night Vision,” Perodua says.

    Note that the three items above require an accessory extension wire harness, sold separately for RM60. With this, there’s no wire-tapping, which will void your car’s warranty. First time buyers of GearUp electrical accessories must also buy the harness. The other options you see here are the luggage tray and coil mats with mesh top. Full GearUp catalogue and pricing here.

    What do you think of the latest GearUp look for the Myvi? It’s not meant to be subtle, because the standard car is subtle and these are just options – perhaps, people who pay extra for a bodykit want something that’s aggressive and unmistakable. Read our review and launch report of the 2022 Myvi.

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5 H with GearUp accessories, Ace bodykit

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi GearUp brochure

     
     
  • 2022 Perodua Myvi facelift review – it’s a no-brainer

    Perodua Myvi 2022 – Quick Facts

    The Myvi 2022 was launched on November 18, 2021.

    It comes in 5 specs – 1.3G without PSDA, 1.3G with PSDA, 1.5X, 1.5H and 1.5 AV.

    Myvi 2022 Prices

    The following are the prices for all 5 specs of the Perodua Myvi 2022:

    Compare Myvi 2022 on CarBase.my: Perodua Myvi G vs X vs H vs AV specs

    Myvi 2022 Safety

    In terms of crash safety, Perodua has not submitted the facelifted Myvi for an ASEAN NCAP crash test, but the pre-facelift Myvi scored a 5-star ASEAN NCAP crash test result.

    In terms of active safety, the 1.3G with PSDA, 1.5X, 1.5H and 1.5AV models get ASA 3.0 with Pre-collision Warning (PCW), Pre-collision Braking (PCB or AEB), Front Departure Alert (FDA), Pedal Misoperation Control (PMC), Lane Departure Warning (LDW) and Lane Departure Prevention (LDP).

    The Myvi 1.3G (with and without PSDA) and 1.5X variants get four airbags as standard, while the 1.5H and 1.5AV get six airbags.

    In terms of child passenger safety, the Myvi 2022 comes with 2 sets of ISOFIX points to mount child seats on the rear bench outer two seats. All 5 seats feature three-point seat belts.

    Myvi 2022 Maintenance Cost

    We have done some analysis on how much it costs to maintain the Perodua Myvi 2022 compared to other cars. You can read more about it via the links below.

    Myvi 2022 Competitors

    Other than the Perodua Myvi 2022, the following compete in the same segment:

    Compare on CarBase.my: Perodua Myvi vs Proton Iriz

    Learn more about the Myvi 2022

    You can read our comprehensive coverage on the Perodua Myvi 2022 to help you discover if the Myvi is a suitable choice for your next car purchase.

    Watch our Perodua Myvi 2022 videos

    We have produced videos of the Myvi 2022 if you prefer watching a video to reading. You can watch them at the below two links.

    Perodua Myvi 2022 Full Review

    What else can be said about the Perodua Myvi? Malaysians call it “king” these days, and while that’s a semi-joke, with some 1.3 million units sold since 2005 over three generations, the Myvi is truly the “Love of the Nation”.

    It has occupied the sales throne from year one. Crosstown rival Proton has tried to challenge the Myvi, and is still plugging away now. I don’t have the figures on hand, but I’m willing to guess that it would take the combined sales of the Proton Savvy (2005-2013, smaller in size), Suprima S (2013-2019, higher segment) and Iriz (2014-present, direct rival) to come close to the monolith that is the Myvi.

    There was also the Satria Neo (2006-2015), which is still one of the prettiest three-door hatchbacks ever made, but unfortunately, there are only so many young car enthusiasts around.

    What makes the Myvi so popular? There’s no single answer, not with over 1m units sold, but as a former owner, I’d hazard a guess. Practical and spacious, economical and reliable. Car guys might yawn, but in case you haven’t realised, that’s what normal people want from a daily ride.

    No need to alter a successful recipe then, especially when the third-generation Myvi – which is four years old now – is still ahead of the just-facelifted Iriz in features and safety. Crucially, it’s still topping the sales charts. But conventional wisdom never cautioned against improving the recipe.

    Safety first

    Perodua is known for many things, but safety was never one of them. That changed with the G3 Myvi, which confounded expectations of an affordable local car. LED headlamps and keyless entry were nice standard-fit items, but P2 pushed out the boat by offering autonomous emergency braking (AEB) as part of the Advanced Safety Assist (ASA) pack in the AV. In 2017, AEB was unprecedented in a sub-RM100k car, never mind a RM55k Perodua.

    Since then, Rawang has doubled down on the safety first strategy and we’re now in the third iteration of ASA, with wider parameters. ASA is also now available in all of Perodua’s models. The next shock came with the Ativa, launched earlier this year with Level 2 autonomous driving features and adaptive LED headlamps. Adaptive cuise control with lane keep assist on a RM70k car is unrivalled.

    You’d think that by now, we’d be desensitised and already half expecting a big leap in the next Perodua product. Still, P2 managed to drop jaws with the Myvi facelift. ASA 3.0, Lane Departure Warning/Prevention and Auto High Beam is available on all variants (optional on base 1.3 G), while the AV gets the Ativa’s ACC and LKC, along with Blind Spot Monitor and Rear Cross Traffic Alert.

    From no cruise control to adaptive cruise control with lane keep – that’s the progress we’re seeing here. Go back five years and tell people that in 2021, the Myvi will “drive itself” and you’ll be driven away as a mad man.

    They really didn’t have to go so far. The recently-facelifted 2022 Iriz/Persona still does not have AEB, as Proton chose to “spend our money on more useful things for the customer” such as an expanded “Hi Proton” system instead of ADAS, which the Myvi has had since 2017. If P2 chose to give the 2022 Myvi ASA 3.0 + LDW/LDP + AHB, it would have been applauded as raising standards without pressure from rivals – this is just a facelift after all.

    Reserving top tier kit for the costlier Ativa would be understandable, too. But no, the best possible safety goodies from Daihatsu are all here in the Myvi. Lighting plays a part in safety as well, and the Myvi G3’s LED eyes – already brighter than those on the 2022 Iriz – get AHB function plus LED daytime running lights as sidekick. The DRLs – available on the H and AV – are a first for Perodua.

    UPDATE: Some have requested comments on the safety systems. Well, there’s not a tonne to say other than all of the features worked as advertised. ACC functions between 30 to 125 km/h, and you can select three levels of distance from the vehicle in front (around 25m, 40m and 50m). Like on the Ativa, the process of slowing down and getting back up to speed could be a bit more subtle, but the fact that a Myvi has ACC is a big deal already.

    There’s no low-speed follow, so it doesn’t work in traffic jams – this is more of a long distance highway drive assistant. A big miss? Well, not all Honda Sensing cars have LSF and Perodua’s surveys tell them that customers prefer using ACC for highway driving.

    ACC with LKC is a great headlining act, but I find its more humble safety teammates such as BSM and AHB to be more valuable in day-to-day driving. These are features that once you get used to their presence, you’ll feel “naked” when jumping into a car without them.

    Same but different

    That safety bundle is good, but it’s the new CVT that truly transforms the Myvi. The long-serving 4AT’s replacement gearbox is something that you feel with every press of the throttle, every overtake, long drive and petrol pump visit.

    Once again, this is something P2 didn’t have to do. The four-speed auto – while old and outdated compared to what other carmakers offer – has been somewhat accepted as the norm for Perodua. It’s a basic gearbox for basic cars. And truth be told, the old stager performs well, with no annoying quirks. Not the most efficient, but a reliable performer. Also, this is just a facelift and mid-life changes don’t typically involve gearbox swaps.

    To make the move even more surprising, Daihatsu’s D-CVT (D for Dual-Mode) isn’t a plug-and-play gearbox for the Myvi. The transmission was designed for DNGA (Daihatsu New Global Architecture) models, and to get it to work here, P2 had to give its best seller the Ativa’s electrical architecture. The resulting car is the first application of D-CVT in a non-DNGA car. Much effort and investment – RM50 million to be exact – for a facelift.

    D-CVT is the world’s first split gear CVT system, combining belt drive with a gear drive for improved fuel efficiency, acceleration and quietness. From rest to low/medium speeds, D-CVT functions like any other CVT, with engine torque going through a torque converter (just like Toyota and Honda CVTs, Proton’s Punch CVT uses a clutch pack) and into the input pulley, before being transferred to the output pulley via a belt and then to the wheels.

    At higher speeds, the D-CVT goes into the split mode, engaging the gear drive to provide more efficient power transmission (less energy loss), while the rotation to the belt drive is decreased significantly. In the Ativa, D-CVT gets a manual mode with seven virtual ratios, but that has been omitted here. More on the D-CVT here.

    Fast but not furious

    Can’t quite picture how it works? It doesn’t matter, because you will definitely feel the difference if you have experience with the 4AT. Immediately, the Myvi feels a lot more effortless to drive around town, and many would be surprised at how easy it is to get up to highway speed. Now, we wouldn’t say that the 4AT was guilty in holding the Myvi’s performance back – the king didn’t get its rep for being slow – but you do feel significantly less resistance with the CVT. The powertrain feels “lighter”, so to speak.

    The pleasant surprises don’t stop once you get up to 110 km/h. The new Myvi’s unchanged 1.5L engine ticks at just below 2,000 rpm at our highway speed limit, which is impressively low, almost like a turbocharged car with a many-speed gearbox. We checked, and the pre-facelift 1.5L with the 4AT turns at 2,750 rpm at 110 km/h. That’s a huge difference for the same engine, and it translates to a more relaxed engine state with reduced buzz. A big boon on long distance drives.

    If the NVH levels of the new Myvi seems better, 100% of the contribution is from the gearbox swap, as no other specific NVH measures were made. This also means that when it rains, the water splashing sound from the rear wheel well – first timers might be alarmed, thinking that there’s a leak somewhere – is carried over.

    The powertrain has a newfound calmness at a cruise, but when it’s overtaking time, “in-gear” acceleration is very good, more effortless than before. Once again, that “lightness” comes to the fore.

    Now, Perodua claims that with the D-CVT, the Myvi is a whopping 20% quicker in the 0-100 km/h sprint, which now stands at 11.5 seconds for the 1.3L and 10.2 seconds for the 1.5L. In practice, and certainly when on the move (rolling start), it feels like a quicker car than 10.2s suggests. And that’s before using the “Power” button on the steering wheel for 1.5L models. Like on the Ativa, pressing this gives you access to maximum engine power. We didn’t really need it.

    Another big claim to complete the win-win is the 5% better fuel economy for the CVT versus the 4AT – the 1.3L now has a claimed combined FC figure of 22.2 km/l (from 21.1 km/l) while the 1.5L is good for 21.1 km/l (from 20.1 km/l).

    We managed to meet the 1.3L’s claim in our 1.5L without trying too hard (90-110 km/h), and while that was on a long highway cruise (another motorway stint with less restraint saw us get 19 km/l), I’d wager that 16-17 km/l would be achievable in mixed driving with some traffic thrown in. We’ll have to confirm this with a daily urban commute test, but the Myvi FL’s cruising economy is fantastic.

    Bear in mind that while the CVT has elevated the Myvi’s FC, it’s coming from a good base. Even with the 4AT, the Myvi was well ahead of the Proton Iriz in efficiency, and it’s down to the carryover DOHC, Dual VVT-i NR engines, which are modern and current. The 1NR-VE 1.3L puts out 94 hp and 121 Nm of torque at 4,000 rpm, while the 2NR-VE 1.5L makes 102 hp and 136 Nm of torque at 4,200 rpm. Both have Eco Idle auto start-stop.

    How does D-CVT compare to others?

    It recently dawned on me that the CVT – which is a bad word among some car enthusiasts – is actually the dominant automatic gearbox in our parts. Given that manual passenger cars sell in the handfuls, CVT is the majority car gearbox, full stop. Not in the US or Europe, but certainly so in ASEAN.

    Think about it. The Southeast Asian auto market is dominated by Japanese brands, and for the likes of Toyota, Honda and Nissan, the CVT is the default transmission, at least for compact passenger cars. Honda Malaysia’s entire range – from City Hatchback to Accord – is CVT-only, and UMW Toyota’s local line-up is CVT all the way to the C-segment. The Nissan Almera made the switch to CVT for the N18 generation. The Proton Iriz/Persona has been CVT since day one.

    With the market leader and the best-selling model in the country going CVT, the stepless auto is now the undisputed majority gearbox in Malaysia – so, if you’re still viewing it as an “alternative” gearbox, you’re either living in the past or belong to the kayangan class because CVTs aren’t a thing in the premium segment. As for the rest of us, get used to it if you haven’t already done so.

    The Honda City, Toyota Vios/Yaris, Nissan Almera and Proton Iriz all use CVTs

    But not all CVTs work and feel the same. In practice, the D-CVT is much like a CVT of today, which means it’s linear and responsive, even if it does not mimic a regular torque converter auto’s stepped feel like some Toyota CVTs.

    If you’re coming from a Proton CVT, congratulations on the quantum leap. While much improved in the response department compared to early iterations, the Punch CVT in the latest Iriz/Persona still leaves much to be desired. It’s particularly poor at a highway cruise, where the engine is kept buzzing according to the travelling speed; you’ll hear it and feel the vibes on the steering wheel, which gets tiring. Where the Proton is highly strung, the Myvi is calm and rested below 2,000 rpm.

    Of course, if you stomp on the pedal, the engine will react with a loud scream. That’s just nature and I personally feel that this is overemphasised when it comes to CVTs – don’t ATs make loud noises at kickdown? In any case, having a progressive right foot and preserving momentum rewards you with swift and serene progress.

    Simply red

    Red is a sporty colour if there’s one, a colour that symbolises passion. You’d better be a fan of red if you want the top Myvi AV though, and we’re not even talking about the AV-exclusive Cranberry Red exterior paint, which looks good. That’s because the range topper’s cabin is very red, and there’s no way to opt out of it.

    You’ll find red on the air con surrounds, meter panel and seats. Large swathes of the latter are in red (almost like red seats with black accents!) and it’s a very bright “Ferrari” tone too, replicated on the rear bench. We can imagine the look to be a bit loud for some.

    If that’s you, the 1.3 G, 1.5 X and 1.5 H have largely black cabins (G and X have hints of maroon on the seat sides) and a monochrome meter panel. Unfortunately you can’t have all the AV’s goodies without the red seats, unless you pay extra for GearUp seat covers.

    The standard instrument panel is new and taken from the base Ativa. The monochrome twin-dial cluster sports a larger multi-info display and is an upgrade on the pre-facelift’s blue-themed item, but the AV-exclusive meter panel is on another level.

    This new meter sees the return of the Optitron style, which is always illuminated but looks blacked out when the car is off (electroluminescent gauges was phased out in the second-generation facelift in 2015). The red theme and sporty graphics remind us of the 2011 “Lagi Power, Lagi Best” Myvi SE cluster and between the dials is a full-height colour TFT multi-info display.

    The MID’s graphics are sharp and there’s plenty of information plus a welcome graphic with the Myvi’s face. I really like the addition of an instantaneous fuel consumption bar and a “drive info” summary of the trip when you turn off the car. Showing the distance, time and average FC of your trip, this is something that even the Ativa doesn’t have. Creatively, the concentric rings that cut into the MID’s sides function as an eco indicator.

    Objectively, the stylised fonts don’t do much for legibility, but I love this new instrument panel. It’s feature-packed, there’s a nice layering to the surface (check it out from the side, the glossy-ringed dials are set forward) and the slick MID gives a whiff of high tech.

    Small changes, big impact

    The touchscreen head unit is larger and features the Ativa’s UI (no Apple CarPlay and Android Auto for now, Perodua will explore these for future products), but for me, the revamped air con controls make a bigger difference. Identical at a glance, P2 has introduced an OFF button that should have been in the G3 from the start. Before this, you’d have to keep pressing the fan down button to switch off the AC, but it’s a single press now.

    The novel and useful AC memory – which debut in the G3 Myvi and is now also in the Aruz and Ativa – is still here, but you now jog through the two positions with a single MEM button (used to be two buttons, one slot made way for OFF). Making improvements based on user feedback is laudable. The wing mirrors now auto fold when the car is locked/unlocked (1.5L models, control panel from the Ativa), and this is sure to be appreciated by owners, too.

    There’s also a new steering wheel, again taken from the Ativa. It’s looks more modern and features some new-to-Myvi buttons, but a few blanks as well, even on the ACC-equipped AV. Seems churlish to complain about this though, given the high content-to-price ratio.

    Other points remain. At its lowest point, the driver’s seat will still be too high for some, and it’s smaller and less supportive than the Iriz’s chair. I got used to the high perch when I owned the G3, but not so much the impaired visibility from the driver’s side A-pillar, apparent in bends. The Iriz, with its quarter windows, doesn’t have this issue.

    High marks for practicality. The full range of homegrown features continue to be here: the built-in SmartTag (H and AV), handbag hook, USB charger + phone slot on the driver’s seat side and tapau hooks integrated into the seat backs. It’s easy to take these little convenience touches for granted, and you’ll probably miss them when you move on. The Ativa gets none of the above, by the way.

    Myvi or Ativa?

    If this wasn’t a particularly loud question before, it certainly will be heard more often now. Because with this facelift, the Myvi has seen a jump in both equipment and price, taking things to within a whisker of the Ativa’s base price (Myvi AV RM58,800, Ativa X RM61,500). Of course, one has an SUV body and a turbo engine, but the Myvi counters with full kit and ADAS features that only the RM71,200 Ativa AV gets.

    Having used a G3 Myvi for one and a half years before swapping it for the Ativa AV, here are some personal observations that go beyond the usual price/kit/value debate.

    The Ativa feels like a very different car from behind the wheel, and that’s because that wheel is set a fair bit higher – unlike some B-segment crossovers, you get a relatively high perch in P2’s SUV, accentuated by tall sides (shallow windows). Other than the occasional idling vibration (a three-cylinder thing, but much less severe than in the Axia/Bezza), the Ativa has significantly better insulation and rolling refinement than its stablemate. Contributing to that cause are high-end touring tyres.

    If the Myvi is more effortless in getting up to highway speed than before, then the Ativa’s acceleration is even more deceptive, perhaps via a combo of turbo torque and the better refinement. Because of this, the Myvi might feel faster, although I doubt it actually is.

    The cheaper car isn’t fully outclassed though; it even betters the Ativa in certain areas. Space and practicality, for one. While the Ativa’s 2,525 mm wheelbase is 25 mm longer than the Myvi, rear passengers in the lower car enjoy better legroom and bigger windows to peer out of. Having an armrest means Ativa owners will have to forgo the Myvi’s front seat side features/pockets, but there’s no excuse for not having the integrated takeaway hooks. Mr.DIY offers a cheap but ugly fix.

    The Ativa misses out on the handbag hook, side USB charger/pockets, tapau hooks and built-in SmartTag

    If you’re a cost conscious motorist looking for the best fuel economy, the Myvi is the clear choice here, especially with the CVT onboard. Driven gently in an urban setting, I’m getting 14+ km/l max on the Ativa, and with less care, it can dip to 11-12 km/l. I’ve yet to go on a long journey, but it won’t be coming close to the 22 km/l we managed to squeeze from the D51A. I’m jealous.

    Would I still have gone for the Ativa if the facelifted Myvi AV was available earlier? Yes, because I had a Myvi and wanted something different. I love the Ativa’s square cut shape, that LR Discovery Sport-style inverse C-pillar and quirky dashboard full of sharp angles and geometric accents (matches the dial of Seiko’s Presage Sharp Edged series, watch guys). It’s no Mazda-style cookie cutter organic design – which MG and seemingly hundreds of other Chinese SUVs have reproduced – and it appears tougher than it is.

    The Ativa is a more premium product and feels that bit more special. But the Myvi is at its best ever level now, and the AV – with all that kit and safety, plus superior FC – looks really good next to the kosong Ativa X. If I had a strict budget of RM60k, it will go to the Myvi – how about you?

    A no-brainer

    The reason for the Myvi’s success is that it’s a no-brainer of a car. It does most things very well for most people, and the only reason someone would opt for an alternative – like an Iriz – is because they want to be different. Driving pleasure, you say. Perhaps, but unless you carve B-road corners as a day job, you’ll be stuck with a poorer car 95% of the time.

    And that’s before Perodua stepped on the gas with this facelift. The new gearbox may be just one bullet point on the brochure, but the CVT completely changes the Myvi’s driving character, while boosting performance and economy for a win-win. As for safety, the G3 was already unchallenged in its price bracket (and beyond); with ACC and LKC – supported by ASA 3.0, BSM, RCTA, AHB and LDW/LDP – the Myvi is now on a completely different plane. And it now has LED daytime running lights!

    So many people cannot be wrong. The no-brainer has gotten better.

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5 AV in Cranberry Red

     
     
  • VIDEO: 2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5L AV first impressions

    As motoring journalists, we often get asked, “what’s the best car to get under RM100k?” The answer is often not as straightforward as one may think, because each individual’s priorities and requirements for cars differ.

    But if there’s one car that deserves a spot in every household, it’s the Perodua Myvi. The 2022 midlife refresh brought about substantial changes to the long-running bestseller, and the fitment of Daihatsu’s D-CVT is arguably the single biggest mechanical upgrade ever made to the Myvi.

    No tweaks were made to both the 1.3 litre and 1.5 litre four-pot engines, but the new transmission alone is responsible for improving fuel efficiency by 5%. We managed a peak of 22.3 km/L while cruising between 90 km/h to 110 km/h on the highway, and an average of 19 km/L in mixed driving conditions. The D-CVT also improves performance by a whopping 20% – the Myvi now sprints from 0 to 100 km/h in 10.2 seconds.

    Prior to this, the Ativa set the industry benchmark for having a comprehensive suite of advanced driver assist systems (the umbrella term for which is PSDA) for vehicles under RM70k. Sliding in at just under RM60k, the Myvi now takes top honours, offering adaptive cruise control with lane keep control for the first time.

    All told, it cannot be understated just how big of a leap this is for the B-segment hatch. Over 1.3 million units of the Myvi have been sold since its debut in 2005, and it has consistently been the best-selling car every year since. Watch our first impressions review to see what we think of it, and feel free to browse CarBase.my for a more detailed look at each variant’s equipment and specifications. Expect a much more in-depth review to come, soon.

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5L AV in Cranberry Red

     
     
  • 2022 Perodua Myvi facelift spec-by-spec comparison – how to pick between 1.3G, 1.5X, 1.5H, 1.5AV variants

    Perodua started the next chapter of the Myvi story yesterday night with the launch of the 2022 Perodua Myvi facelift. Much like the Volkswagen Golf in Europe and the Proton Saga here, back in the day, the Myvi is a package that seems to fit universal needs. It just works.

    Perodua has shifted some 1.3 million units of the mass appealing “people’s car” since 2005, and the current third generation has found 277,329 homes in four years. A mid-life update was due, and instead of just doing the minimum – a new feature or two to accompany a bumper/grille change, you know the drill – they threw a kitchen sink worth RM50 million and 137,000 man hours at the D20N.

    That’s substantial investment for a facelift, but look at the improvements in the D51A and you’ll see why. The actual facelift is a heavy one, with new headlamps and the debut of LED daytime running lights. The interior receives new meter panels and small changes based on user feedback (the ‘Off’ button for the AC panel, for instance), plus big differentiation for the red-heavy AV.

    But the big news is the switch from the trusty 4AT to the new D-CVT gearbox from the Ativa. This required the SUV’s more advanced electrical architecture as well, but the gains at both ends are worth it – 5% better fuel economy and 20% faster 0-100 km/h times, with a bonus of lower noise levels.

    No less important and perhaps more showroom/headline-friendly are the new safety features. Just think about it: adaptive cruise control with lane keep on a Myvi, which didn’t even have regular cruise control before this. Level 2 autonomous features are joined by ASA 3.0 (the latest version, as per Ativa), blind spot monitoring and auto high beam. In a sub-RM60k car.

    Usually, companies upgrade their products because of competition, trying to one up the rival. Not so here. Frankly, P2 could have got away with just a bumper change because the just-facelifted 2022 Proton Iriz and Persona are nowhere near the four-year old pre-facelift Myvi G3 in efficiency and safety, the two most important factors for regular car buyers. And they could have kept all the top stuff for the costlier Ativa, but they did what they did anyway.

    We’ve detailed the Myvi facelift in our launch report and walk-around video yesterday, and you can check it out for all you need to know on the D51A. This post is spec-by-spec comparison that we’ve compiled for you to have a quick glance at the specs.

    To recap, the 2022 Myvi range has five variants – 1.3 G, 1.3 G with PSDA (safety features including ASA), 1.5 X, 1.5 H and the top 1.5 AV – priced from RM45,700 to RM58,800, on-the-road without insurance and SST. Here’s what each variant gets, in point form.

    2022 Perodua Myvi 1.3 G – RM45,700 (without PSDA), RM47,700 (with PSDA)

    Gets as standard:
    Mechanicals

    • 1.3L Dual VVT-i engine (1NR-VE) with Eco Idle
    • 1,329 cc, four-cylinder petrol
    • 94 hp at 6,000 rpm, 121 Nm at 4,000 rpm
    • D-CVT automatic gearbox
    • 22.2 km/l combined fuel consumption
    • 36-litre fuel tank
    • 3,895 mm long, 1,735 mm wide, 1,515 mm tall, 2,500 mm wheelbase
    • 160 mm ground clearance
    • Electric power steering (EPS)
    • 4.8-metre turning radius
    • Five-year/150,000 km warranty

    Exterior

    • LED headlamps with auto off and follow-me-home functions
    • Manual headlight levelling
    • LED tail lamps with light guides
    • Black electrically-adjustable side mirrors with LED turn signals
    • Aeroblade-type windscreen wipers with speed-linked intermittent
    • Reverse sensors
    • 14-inch alloy wheels, 175/65 tyres
    • Full-size spare tyre
    • Metallic silver front grille

    Interior

    • Keyless entry and push start
    • Speed sensitive auto door lock
    • Acoustic windscreen
    • Power windows, auto up/down for driver only
    • 2-DIN head unit with radio and USB input, four speakers (10 cm/10 cm)
    • Digital air-con controls (with two memory settings)
    • Steering with tilt adjustment
    • Height-adjustable driver’s seat
    • New seat fabric, standard design
    • 60:40 folding rear seats with integrated headrests
    • 277 litre boot (expandable to 832L with rear seats down)
    • Side pocket on front seat (for mobile phones)
    • Shopping hook and anti-snatch handbag hook

    Safety

    • Four airbags (dual front, front sides)
    • ABS, EBD, VSC
    • Emergency Stop Signal (ESS)
    • Hill Start Assist
    • Five-star ASEAN NCAP crash test rating
    • Seat belt reminder for all seats
    • Two Isofix anchors for rear seats
    • ASA 3.0 with Pre-collision Warning (PCW)
    • Pre-collision Braking (PCB or AEB)
    • Front Departure Alert (FDA)
    • Pedal Misoperation Control (PMC)
    • Auto High Beam (AHB)
    • Lane Departure Warning (LDW) and Lane Departure Prevention (LDP)

    2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5 X – RM49,900

    Adds on:
    Mechanicals

    • 1.5 litre Dual VVT-i engine (2NR-VE) with Eco Idle
    • 1,496 cc, four-cylinder petrol
    • 102 hp at 6,000 rpm, 136 Nm at 4,200 rpm
    • 21.1 km/l combined fuel consumption
    • 5.1-metre turning radius

    Exterior

    • 15-inch alloy wheels, 185/55 tyres
    • Auto LED headlamps with follow-me-home function
    • Auto folding, power-retractable side mirrors

    Interior

    • Glossy silver air con vent trim
    • Door trim with silver finish
    • Bluetooth function
    • Larger rear speakers (16 cm)
    • Audio and call steering buttons
    • Power mode steering button

    2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5 H – RM53,900

    Adds on:
    Exterior

    • LED daytime running lights
    • Gloss black front grille
    • Front lip and side skirts
    • Two-tone rear bumper
    • Rear spoiler
    • Chrome door handles
    • Front parking sensors

    Interior

    • Silver finish on gear lever
    • Chrome door handles
    • Honeycomb design fabric seats
    • Detachable, adjustable rear headrests
    • Built-in toll reader
    • 6.9-inch touchscreen head unit with USB, Bluetooth, SmartLink, HDMI
    • Leather-wrapped steering
    • Voice recognition control
    • Solar and security window film

    Safety

    • Six airbags (front, side, curtain)

    2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5 AV – RM58,800

    Adds on:
    Interior

    • Optitron-style red-themed instrument panel
    • TFT colour multi-info display
    • Glossy red air con vent trim
    • Red-black leather seats
    • ACC, LKC, MID steering buttons
    • Front dashcam
    • Reverse camera

    Safety

    • Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC)
    • Lane Keep Control (LKC)
    • Blind Spot Monitor (BSM)
    • Rear Cross Traffic Alert (RCTA)

    Colour options for the 2022 Perodua Myvi

    • Cranberry Red (AV only)
    • Electric Blue
    • Lava Red (not available for AV)
    • Glittering Silver
    • Granite Grey (not available for 1.3G)
    • Ivory White (solid)

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5 AV

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5 H

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5 X

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5 AV official images

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5 H official images

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5 X official images

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi 1.3 G with PSDA official images

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi features, official images

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi GearUp accessories

     
     
  • 2022 Perodua Myvi facelift launched – RM46k-RM59k, D-CVT, ASA 3.0, ACC, 5% better FC, 20% faster 0-100

    After the short burst of announcements and teasers, the 2022 Perodua Myvi facelift is now officially launched. This is the mid-life refresh of the third generation of Malaysia’s best seller, and it comes four years after the “G3” Myvi surfaced in late 2017.

    If you’re wondering how popular exactly is the Myvi, Perodua has sold some 1.3 million units of the five-door hatchback since May 2005. Of this total, the third-generation has contributed 277,329 units, or almost 70k a year. It wasn’t that long ago that carmakers insisted that Malaysians prefer sedans – look where we are now. Love of the nation indeed.

    “The Myvi has struck all the right cords with Malaysians and has been widely accepted by the people. This new offering is to ensure that our valued customers are getting the best value as possible,” said Perodua president and CEO Datuk Zainal Abidin Ahmad, putting it lightly.

    We don’t really realise it as consumers, but new products are planned way in advance, and this D51A project started back in February 2019, slightly more than a year after the third-gen’s launch. Since then, over 137,000 man hours have been poured into improving Malaysia’s best selling car, and the total project cost is a rather substantial RM50 million, especially for a facelift. You’ll see why in a bit.

    Perodua has acquired a habit of raising the tech and features bar by some margin with every new product, and the Ativa, its latest model, debut earlier this year with driver assist and lighting tech that’s unprecedented for a RM100k car, never mind that the AV is just above RM70k.

    The Rawang carmaker still regards the Myvi, a Malaysian icon, as its flagship model, and “Myvi can’t be left behind in terms of technology advancement,” the company says, in reference to the new bar set by the Ativa. So, although they could have got away with just some cosmetics (because it’s just a facelift, and B-segment cars from Proton are yet to catch up in safety and efficiency anyway), the Myvi gets a heavy update.

    In fact, I don’t remember a more comprehensive facelift than this one in Perodua’s history. More than just a bumper swap, there’s plenty of new tech and equipment, colours and trim, as well as a major change in the powertrain department. Plenty to unpack, so let’s go.

    LED DRLs, a Perodua first

    It’s quite an anomaly that LED daytime running lights is making its debut on a Perodua, here and now. The Myvi G3 debut in 2017 with full LED headlamps across the range (a bigger deal than DRLs), while the Ativa raised the game with Audi Matrix LED-style Adaptive Driving Beam headlamps, replete with sequential signals. Fancy stuff only seen way above RM100k, but still no LED DRLs (the GearUp ‘Blaze’ kit had them, but as a cost option).

    They’re here now, as vertical strips on the new bumper’s edges. The LED DRLs replace the old halogen fog lamps, and they’re automatically on during the day, when the headlamps are not turned on. When it gets dark and the headlamps are on, the DRLs are no longer needed – it’s a case of either or. LED DRLs are reserved for the top two trim levels, H and AV.

    Just a note for future owners. There’s no way to manually turn on the DRLs at night, as all 1.5L models have auto headlamps, which detect that it’s dark and the headlamps should be on. The other manual stalk positions are for the position lamps and headlamps – there’s no “Off” position that would normally bring the DRLs out.

    Fresh face with a big X

    The facelift is no nip/tuck and the latest Myvi won’t be confused with the original G3, at least from the front. The swoopy wide face makes way for a strong X look. There’s a larger and deeper grille, with a slim chrome strip that runs under the Perodua badge and into the headlights. The front bumper features sharp contours around the downturned centre air intake, and is framed by the above-mentioned LED DRL strips.

    The gloss black lip now has a silver centre section, which is almost like a skid plate-like trim on SUVs (H and AV). Look closely at the headlamps and you’ll notice that it has been “cut” at the end that meets the grille. The actual headlamps within are new, and so is the internal housing. New shape headlamps aren’t very common with facelifts, which generally seek to have a fresh look at minimal cost.

    The rear bumper is new, and it sports vertical vents on the extremes to match the LED strips in front. There’s a two-tone look for the top variants – black around the license plate. The tail lamps have been carried over wholesale, along with the 15-inch alloys (185/55 tyres), which are already rather high spec with diamond cut and a two-tone finish. Like on the Ativa, all trim levels have black painted wing mirrors.

    You better like red, or else…

    You better like the colour red, a lot, if you’re eyeing the top AV. It’s not a sprinkle of red here and there, but the cabin is dominated by the bold colour. The air con vents have red bezels, and the new instrument panel has a sporty red theme, but it’s seats that make the red stand out so much here.

    The AV’s leather seats have a red centre section that’s perforated, coupled with a red outline of the seat. Together, there’s more red than black, and the chosen tone is a rather bright red, lighter than the new signature exterior Cranberry Red hue and the red in Ativa AV. Not many would be asking for more red, but for the few, there’s no red stitching for the steering and gear area.

    The other variants get new fabric seats, and they’re all dark. The H seats have an interesting scaly pattern that reminds me of snakeskin. No red theme for other variants, so the theme is black with some silver trim. No more chrome rings for the AC vents – it’s all silver now.

    The steering wheel is new, taken from the Ativa. It looks nice and more modern, and the spokes have enough space for all of the D51A’s new safety features. Note that it’s not full, even on the AV – there are four blanks compared to the Ativa AV’s one – but really, no one should be complaining about kit, as the Myvi runs rings around the latest 2022 Iriz and Persona facelifts.

    The side panel below the driver’s AC vent is full though, thanks to the Auto High Beam button. It contains a new wing mirror control panel, again from the Ativa.

    The whole range gets new instrument panels, but the AV gets an exclusive red themed cluster, which sporty graphics remind us of the 2011 “Lagi Power, Lagi Best” Myvi SE cluster. Between the two glossy ringed dials is a full-height colour TFT multi-info display with a welcome graphic (date and the Myvi’s face) and instantaneous fuel consumption bar.

    This new meter is of the Optitron style, which is always illuminated but looks blacked out when the car is off. The Myvi actually used electroluminescent gauges before, but it was phased out in the second-generation facelift in 2015.

    The non-AV variants get simpler white-lit dials with a slightly smaller LCD MID. This is shared with the base Ativa X, the only variant of the SUV using analogue dials. To the left of that is a new head unit with a touchscreen size that has been expanded from 6.2 to 6.9 inches wide (H and AV). The user interface follows the revolving tiles look of the Ativa’s HU.

    The air con panel looks identical at a glance, but look closely and you’ll notice that there’s just one memory button instead of two. That’s because one of the buttons is now an “Off” button – previously, to turn off the AC, one had to press the fan down button repeatedly, so this is an improvement. Don’t worry, it’s still capable of two memory settings, just jog through the “MEM” button.

    The row of buttons above the AC panel is now full, thanks to seatbelt reminders for the three rear seats. Finally, the gear lever markers now have S and B modes that replace 3 and 2. This is because of the gearbox change from 4AT to CVT – S is the self-explanatory Sport, while B is for maximum engine braking, useful for downhill stretches.

    Speaking of modes, there’s a new Power button on the steering wheel for 1.5L models. Like on the Ativa, pressing this gives you access to maximum engine power. It works the in both D and S gear modes. Lastly, the Myvi now has auto door lock, which engages at 20 km/h. The key fob has been changed to the Ativa’s.

    All of the Myvi’s unique homegrown convenience features have been retained, including the integrated toll reader (built-in SmartTag), seat side USB charging port with phone pocket, handbag hook and tapau hooks integrated into the front seat backs. By the way, the Ativa gets none of the above (armrest takes up space between the seats), and you’ll only miss them when they’re gone.

    Safety is the main priority

    Level 2 autonomous driving and Adaptive Cruise Control on a Myvi that before this didn’t have regular cruise control – that’s the leap we’re seeing here. In truth, Perodua didn’t strictly need to upgrade this department as the pre-facelift Myvi is still unchallenged in the sub-RM60k national car arena, and then some.

    Proton facelifted the Iriz and Persona this year and chose to “spend our money on more useful things for the customer” such as an expanded “Hi Proton” system instead of ADAS. Meanwhile, Perodua debuted its Advanced Safety Assist (ASA) in the Myvi in 2017, rolled out an improved ASA 2.0 in the Aruz in 2019 and introduced ASA 3.0 with the Ativa this year, a component under the new Perodua Smart Drive Assist (PSDA) umbrella.

    The ASA suite – which includes Pre-collision Warning (PCW), Pre-collision Braking (PCB or AEB), Front Departure Alert (FDA) and Pedal Misoperation Control (PMC) – is standard across the 2022 Myvi range except for the base 1.3 G, which can be had with ASA, Auto High Beam and Lane Departure Warning/Prevention as an option pack.

    ASA 3.0 updates include two-wheeled vehicle detection for PCW and PCB (pedestrian detection already added in 2.0), and an expanded operating range for PCW, now 4-120 km/h, up by 20 km/h. PCB or AEB can now be used for an unlimited amount of times. Previously, after three auto braking stops, the engine has to be restarted to reboot the system. ASA also works at night now, but only for cars and if their tail lamps are on.

    All cars with ASA also come with Lane Departure Warning and Lane Departure Prevention, which detects road markers and warns you (audio and visual) if you’re veering off track. LDP will tug the steering and pull you back in line.

    The Myvi AV goes semi-autonomous with the addition of Lane Keep Control (LKC) and Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC). Like on the Ativa, ACC works between 30 to 125 km/h with three levels of distance from the vehicle in front. It has no low-speed follow so it doesn’t work in traffic jams. The range topping variant is also the only one to come with Blind Spot Monitor (BSM, buzzer will sound if signal lamp activated, otherwise just the lamp) and Rear Cross Traffic Alert (RCTA).

    Auto High Beam (AHB) is available on all but the base non-ASA G. Reflector LED headlamps are standard across the Myvi range – as before – and if you turn AHB on, it will be active above 30 km/h, or when surroundings are very dark. The system will auto dip the high beam when it detects oncoming traffic, so you don’t have to manually flash the high beam. P2 has reserved the next level Audi Matrix LED-style Adaptive Driving Beam for the Ativa H and AV, which is fair.

    Front corner parking sensors are available from the 1.5 H up, but the reverse camera and dashcam are exclusive to the AV. As for airbags, it’s four for the 1.3 G and 1.5 X, and six for the H and AV. VSA is of course standard.

    4AT hands the baton to CVT

    If the changes ended with the safety boost, it would have been a big facelift. But Perodua didn’t stop there, electing to improve on the efficiency of the powertrain by swapping the long-serving four-speed automatic gearbox for a CVT. Called D-CVT for Dual-Mode CVT, the stepless gearbox is the same unit that made its debut in the Ativa.

    Interestingly, this is the first application of the D-CVT in a non-DNGA (Daihatsu New Global Architecture) car, and the Myvi now uses the Ativa’s electrical architecture to support all the latest functions.

    D-CVT is the world’s first split gear CVT system. Basically, the unit combines belt drive with a gear drive for improved fuel efficiency, acceleration feel and quietness. From rest to low/medium speeds, the D-CVT functions like any other CVT, with the engine’s torque going through a torque converter (like Toyota and Honda CVTs, Proton’s Punch CVT uses a clutch pack) and into the input pulley, before being transferred to the output pulley via a belt and then to the wheels.

    At higher speeds, the D-CVT shifts into its split mode, engaging the gear drive to provide more efficient power transmission (less energy loss), while the rotation to the belt drive is decreased significantly. In the Ativa, D-CVT gets a manual mode with seven virtual ratios, but that has been omitted here. More on the D-CVT here.

    There’s good reason for the switch from 4AT to CVT. Even with unchanged engines, Perodua is touting 5% better fuel economy – the 1.3L now has a claimed combined FC figure of 22.2 km/l (from 21.1 km/l) while the 1.5L is good for 21.1 km/l (from 20.1 km/l). As usual, shave off a few km/l for real-world consumption – it’ll still be very good.

    Perhaps you aren’t surprised by the FC gains; after all, CVTs are known for their efficiency. You’re more into performance, and you’re expecting a price to pay in that department. Sorry to disappoint, but the D-CVT-equipped Myvi is now a whopping 20% quicker in 0-100 km/h acceleration times – 11.5 seconds for the 1.3L and 10.2 seconds for the 1.5L. Doesn’t sound like much, but as most Malaysians know, the “king of the road” is no slow poke in the real world. It does miss out on the manual mode in the Ativa though.

    Improved FC and performance is a win-win, but here’s a bonus – with the CVT, the Myvi will now cruise at a lower rpm, which translates to lower sound levels.

    The Dual VVT-i, DOHC NR engines are modern and current, and they carry on unchanged. The 1NR-VE 1.3 litre unit puts out 94 hp at 6,000 rpm and 121 Nm of torque at 4,000 rpm. The 2NR-VE 1.5 litre meanwhile makes 102 hp at 6,000 rpm and 136 Nm of torque at 4,200 rpm. Both have Eco Idle auto start-stop.

    Colours, variants and pricing

    There’s even a new colour to go along with all the changes. Cranberry Red is the hero colour here, reserved for the AV with its red interior.

    Cranberry Red is a striking new colour that’s should be appealing to many – it’s “more red” than the Ativa’s sparkly Pearl Delima Red – which appears orangey in sunlight – and brighter than the Aruz’s new Passion Red. The existing Lava Red, which cannot be had with the AV, is a regular “Ferrari red” that looks like a solid colour.

    Cranberry aside, the other colours are the 2020-onwards Electric Blue, Lava Red, Granite Grey, Glittering Silver and solid Ivory White. Granite Grey is not available on the base 1.3 G, but every other hue is fair game. I shudder to imagine an Electric Blue AV with that red interior…

    Finally, variants and pricing. As revealed earlier, the base manual version has been discontinued (less than 1% of total Myvi G3 sales means it can’t be defended), so the 2022 Myvi facelift range starts from the 1.3 G without ASA/LDW/LDP/AHB for RM45,700. Like all the safety bits but don’t care for frills? The 1.3 G with ASA/LDW/LDP/AHB can be had at exactly RM2,000 more, at RM47,700.

    If it was entirely up to Perodua, ASA would have been across the board, but they recognise that there are some who prefer maximum affordability. This group, and car modders, are expected to amount to no more than 5% of total buyers. The market leader thinks that Malaysians do care about safety kit, and are willing to pay for it if they can.

    As the G is the sole 1.3L variant this time around, the next step up is the 1.5 X at RM49,900. Aside from the bigger engine, the entry 1.5L variant gets ASA/LDW/LDP/AHB, Power mode, auto headlamps, auto folding side mirrors (when car is locked/unlocked) and Bluetooth for the non-touchscreen head unit. All 1.5L cars roll on 15-inch wheels, an inch up on the 1.3L.

    On the next rung is the RM53,900 1.5 H, which is the highest spec Myvi that those allergic to red can buy. The white example you see here has an exterior that’s identical to the AV, coming with the new LED DRLs, gloss black front grille, front lip, chrome door handles, two-tone side skirts, two-tone rear bumper and rear spoiler – this sporty appearance makes a big visual difference.

    Inside, the H is the only Myvi variant to get honeycomb pattern fabric seats. This spec also receives the enlarged touchscreen head unit (USB, Bluetooth, SmartLink, HDMI, voice recognition), built-in toll reader, leather-wrapped steering, chrome door handles, adjustable/detachable rear headrests, solar/security window film. Safety wise, the H offers six airbags and front parking sensors.

    Finally, the RM58,800 AV, which adds on the previously mentioned AV-exclusive interior bits (red leather seats, red AC rings, red-themed meter panel with TFT MID), reverse camera, dashcam and ACC/LKC/BSM/RCTA. If the Ativa AV broke new ground by offering this level of ADAS at just above RM70k, here’s the same for below RM60k, which is astonishing.

    Click to enlarge spec sheet, price list

    To recap, the range starts with the non-ASA 1.3 G at RM45,700. The 1.3 G with ASA/LDW/LDP/AHB is RM2k more at RM47,700. The 1.5L range starts with the X at RM49,900, while the 1.5 H – which has the AV’s exterior – is priced at RM53,900. The top dog AV with all the red bells and safety whistles is yours for RM58,800. Of course, there are GearUp accessories to be had as well, although there’s no bodykit, for now. Check out the add-on items in the gallery below, and in detail here.

    Prices are on-the-road excluding insurance and sales tax; exemption for the latter has been extended to June 30, 2022. If you remove the discontinued 1.3 MT, the pre-facelift price range was from RM43,029 (1.3 G AT) to RM52,697 (AV), which means that there’s a price increase of a few thousand ringgit to go along with the new tech/features.

    So, what do you think of the 2022 Perodua Myvi facelift, its new looks/features, and the overall package?

    2022 Perodua Myvi 1.3 G – RM45,700 (without PSDA), RM47,700 (with PSDA)

    Gets as standard:
    Mechanicals

    • 1.3L Dual VVT-i engine (1NR-VE) with Eco Idle
    • 1,329 cc, four-cylinder petrol
    • 94 hp at 6,000 rpm, 121 Nm at 4,000 rpm
    • D-CVT automatic gearbox
    • 22.2 km/l combined fuel consumption
    • 36-litre fuel tank
    • 3,895 mm long, 1,735 mm wide, 1,515 mm tall, 2,500 mm wheelbase
    • 160 mm ground clearance
    • Electric power steering (EPS)
    • 4.8-metre turning radius
    • Five-year/150,000 km warranty

    Exterior

    • LED headlamps with auto off and follow-me-home functions
    • Manual headlight levelling
    • LED tail lamps with light guides
    • Black electrically-adjustable side mirrors with LED turn signals
    • Aeroblade-type windscreen wipers with speed-linked intermittent
    • Reverse sensors
    • 14-inch alloy wheels, 175/65 tyres
    • Full-size spare tyre
    • Metallic silver front grille

    Interior

    • Keyless entry and push start
    • Speed sensitive auto door lock
    • Acoustic windscreen
    • Power windows, auto up/down for driver only
    • 2-DIN head unit with radio and USB input, four speakers (10 cm/10 cm)
    • Digital air-con controls (with two memory settings)
    • Steering with tilt adjustment
    • Height-adjustable driver’s seat
    • New seat fabric, standard design
    • 60:40 folding rear seats with integrated headrests
    • 277 litre boot (expandable to 832L with rear seats down)
    • Side pocket on front seat (for mobile phones)
    • Shopping hook and anti-snatch handbag hook

    Safety

    • Four airbags (dual front, front sides)
    • ABS, EBD, VSC
    • Emergency Stop Signal (ESS)
    • Hill Start Assist
    • Five-star ASEAN NCAP crash test rating
    • Seat belt reminder for all seats
    • Two Isofix anchors for rear seats
    • ASA 3.0 with Pre-collision Warning (PCW)
    • Pre-collision Braking (PCB or AEB)
    • Front Departure Alert (FDA)
    • Pedal Misoperation Control (PMC)
    • Auto High Beam (AHB)
    • Lane Departure Warning (LDW) and Lane Departure Prevention (LDP)

    2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5 X – RM49,900

    Adds on:
    Mechanicals

    • 1.5 litre Dual VVT-i engine (2NR-VE) with Eco Idle
    • 1,496 cc, four-cylinder petrol
    • 102 hp at 6,000 rpm, 136 Nm at 4,200 rpm
    • 21.1 km/l combined fuel consumption
    • 5.1-metre turning radius

    Exterior

    • 15-inch alloy wheels, 185/55 tyres
    • Auto LED headlamps with follow-me-home function
    • Auto folding, power-retractable side mirrors

    Interior

    • Glossy silver air con vent trim
    • Door trim with silver finish
    • Bluetooth function
    • Larger rear speakers (16 cm)
    • Audio and call steering buttons
    • Power mode steering button

    2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5 H – RM53,900

    Adds on:
    Exterior

    • LED daytime running lights
    • Gloss black front grille
    • Front lip and side skirts
    • Two-tone rear bumper
    • Rear spoiler
    • Chrome door handles
    • Front parking sensors

    Interior

    • Silver finish on gear lever
    • Chrome door handles
    • Honeycomb design fabric seats
    • Detachable, adjustable rear headrests
    • Built-in toll reader
    • 6.9-inch touchscreen head unit with USB, Bluetooth, SmartLink, HDMI
    • Leather-wrapped steering
    • Voice recognition control
    • Solar and security window film

    Safety

    • Six airbags (front, side, curtain)

    2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5 AV – RM58,800

    Adds on:
    Interior

    • Optitron-style red-themed instrument panel
    • TFT colour multi-info display
    • Glossy red air con vent trim
    • Red-black leather seats
    • ACC, LKC, MID steering buttons
    • Front dashcam
    • Reverse camera

    Safety

    • Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC)
    • Lane Keep Control (LKC)
    • Blind Spot Monitor (BSM)
    • Rear Cross Traffic Alert (RCTA)

    Colour options for the 2022 Perodua Myvi

    • Cranberry Red (AV only)
    • Electric Blue
    • Lava Red (not available for AV)
    • Glittering Silver
    • Granite Grey (not available for 1.3G)
    • Ivory White (solid)

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5 AV

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5 H

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5 X

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5 AV official images

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5 H official images

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5 X official images

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi 1.3 G with PSDA official images

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi features, official images

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi GearUp accessories

     
     
  • 2022 Perodua Myvi facelift – detailed walk-around video on what’s new, plus the good and the bad

    While it may not feel like it, especially with the last two years, it has been a full four years since the third-generation Myvi was launched in 2017. In fact, with the official launch of the 2022 Myvi facelift today, it’s almost to the day.

    Considering that it’s a mid-life facelift and not an all-new model, this one goes further than usual. Visually, there’s a striking new look, with a fresh front bumper and plenty of leading lines as well as sharp edges resulting in an edgy new look compared to before.

    The main grille is now much larger, extending far lower than the headlamps. This gives the Myvi a more prominent look, while drawing closer to a more streamlined family design language as seen on the Ativa SUV. Indeed, place it side by side with the previous version and it’s quite a significant visual change.

    Take a step back and you’ll see an X theme on the front bumper, somewhat similar to the X-Concept shown at KLIMS 2018. The new Cranberry Red colour is also similar to the show car. Exclusive to the Myvi AV, the new paint job is much darker than the more orangey Pearl Delima Red on the Ativa, and looks more exclusive than the Lava Red that is still available on lower Myvi variants.

    The headlights are brand new, with a small cut off at the inside edge. There’s also a connecting chrome strip that ties it together with the new grille. Now, you may be asking, if Perodua is already designing new headlamps for this facelift, why didn’t it go further by introducing slimmer units like what it did with the Bezza facelift.

    Well, to do that for the Myvi would require fitting new front fenders, which would be too costly for a facelift. Perodua says it has already spent around RM50 million for this mid-life update. Still, the designers have added more black housings inside the headlamps for them to appear slimmer than before.

    All new are the LED daytime running lights, fitted for the very first time as standard on a Perodua. This is perhaps one of the most requested features among customers, so better late than never. While the Ativa has them too, it’s only as part of the Blaze GearUp bodykit. However, the vertical strips are positioned on the front bumper on the Myvi, replacing the foglamps entirely, instead of being integrated within the full LED headlamps.

    At the bottom is a new front skirting, finished in gloss black with a silver trim down the middle that’s styled almost like an SUV’s skidplate. Together with the DRLs, these are only fitted on the 1.5 H and 1.5 AV variants.

    In comparison, the 1.3 G and 1.5 X models have a much cleaner looking face. To me, it kinda looks like someone who has just shaved off his beard after a long time. A bit too fresh, perhaps.

    In terms of wheels, the 2022 Myvi retains the units from before, 14 inchers on lower variants and 15s on the upper models. While this may look like a strange decision for a facelift, the existing wheels already have premium touches like a dual-tone look and machined finish, so it fits the facelift look just as well. It also helps that the original wheels look very good to begin with.

    Another small change are the black side mirror caps, which is standard on all Myvi variants, just like on the Ativa. At the back, there are very minimal changes, with just a new, more chiselled and sharper look to the rear bumper to match the front look. On the whole, the exterior facelift is quite substantial.

    More colour, added refinement

    Inside, it’s again familiar territory, but with the red highlights on the Ativa being well received by customers, the automaker has put in a whole lot more red into the Myvi, with the colour found on the seats, around the AC vents and even the new instrument cluster.

    While the red on the seats dresses up the cabin, the other red bits on the dashboard have more functionality to them. The original air-condition vent design had chrome ring surrounds, but owners soon realised that they had a tendency to reflect sunlight into the driver’s eyes. So now, the trim pieces are finished in silver in the lower versions, and red on the AV.

    The AV gets a new red meter cluster, with a sporty look that is actually quite similar to the 2011 “Lagi Power, Lagi Best” Myvi SE. The colour multi-info display is also unique to the new AV, with extra controls for things like the blind spot monitor and turn signals. Other variants get a simpler set of white meters with a monochrome screen, taken from the base Ativa X.

    Either way, the meters have gone back to the Optitron-style electroluminescent cluster, so they appear completely blacked out until turned on. The first-generation Myvi already had this, before being downgraded to backlit meters in the second-generation facelift in 2015. However, there is still no temperature gauge to be found anywhere.

    A new steering wheel finds its way on. Taken directly from the Ativa, it looks much better than the previous version. However, it has quite a few blank buttons, even on the top spec AV, which looks a bit off.

    The lower variants have less and less buttons too, which look really cheap. The 1.3 G doesn’t have any buttons on them, in fact. As for the seats, the 1.3 G and 1.5 X get plain fabric upholstery with red side bolsters, while the 1.5 G gets a new snakeskin-like fabric design. Another change is the key fob, now matching the Ativa.

    The touchscreen head unit on the 1.5 H and AV now has a slightly larger 6.9-inch display and the latest control interface like the Ativa. Unfortunately, there’s still no Apple CarPlay or Android Auto support, although SmartLink screen mirroring for Androids is still available. However, the reverse camera is only for the AV.

    The X and G variants get a button-type head unit, which is fine for this price range, but the lack of Bluetooth on the G, I think, goes against all the good work Perodua has done in elevating safety standards for cars in Malaysia.

    The air-condition controls have also been updated. There’s now a new Off button, so users can just use that instead of pressing the fan down button repeatedly to switch the AC off. The two memory settings are still here, but you’ll have to cycle through them with a single button.

    Another new addition is a dash cam on the top variants. Together with the solar and security window tint already fitted, this means that the Myvi arrives in a perfect “buy and drive” condition. There’s no need to spend extra cash at accessory shops anymore.

    Speaking of accessories, as usual there are a few GearUp add-ons available as options, like leather seat covers, LED scuff plates, mesh carpeting and even floor lighting. There are no bodykits available at launch, however. Those are likely to come in a few months time.

    Beyond that, it’s the same ultra practical third-gen Myvi interior that has made it the best selling car in Malaysia for four years running. The integrated toll reader is still here, giving it an edge over the Ativa, together with the anti-snatch handbag hook and handy teh tarik hooks on the seats.

    Interior space is also class leading, with more legroom in the back than the Ativa. Tall adults can fit in the back just fine, and the backrest angle is quite comfy too. Boot space remains at 277 litres, respectable for the class.

    On the flipside, most of the existing drawbacks of the Myvi cabin are still here too – the rather small seats are still the same, and the steering wheel still only adjusts for tilt, not reach. Also, as before, there’s no centre armrest and rear air-con vents.

    Same engines, but there’s a new drivetrain

    No changes to the powertrains, so the facelift continues with the existing 1.3 and 1.5 litre Dual VVT-i four-cylinder naturally-aspirated engines. Outputs are similar, with 94 hp and 121 Nm on the 1.3 litre and 102 hp and 136 Nm on the 1.5.

    Changes have however come with the transmission. For starters, there’s no more manual option available for the Myvi any more. Before anyone starts complaining, know that out of the hundreds of thousands of Myvis sold in the past four years, less than 1% of customers chose the manual. Numbers do not lie, so that’s the end of that.

    The bigger news is that the Myvi’s long serving four-speed automatic transmission has been swapped out in favour of the D-CVT from the Ativa. This dual-mode continuously variable transmission has been transplanted into the existing Myvi platform, which is the first time the D-CVT has ever been fitted to a non-DNGA car. If you have doubts on CVTs in general, do know that we’ve tested it on the Ativa, and found it to be very good in terms of response, smoothness and even refinement.

    Perodua claims that with the D-CVT, the Myvi is now 5% more fuel efficient than before, with the 1.3 claimed to do up to 22.2 km/l, and the 1.5 up to 21.1 km/l – both increased by one km/l. What’s far more significant is the acceleration times, which is around 20% better with D-CVT.

    The 0-100 times are claimed to be 11.5 seconds for the 1.3, and 10.2 seconds for the 1.5. Now, 20% is a big upgrade, no matter how you look at it. And like on the Ativa, there’s also a Power button on the steering wheel that gives slightly better immediate acceleration for quick overtaking manoeuvres.

    Another aspect that’s been improved is refinement. The D-CVT is said to have a gear ratio spread that’s comparable to an eight-speed automatic, allowing for lower engine rpm at cruising speeds. That should make highway trips more comfortable. Another minor change is the S and B driving modes in the gear lever, replacing the 3 and 2 modes from before. S is for Sport, while B is for Braking when going downhill.

    More safety kit as ASA goes 3.0

    As for safety, the Myvi has been upgraded to the latest advanced tech on the Ativa. It’s actually amazing to see how quickly the Myvi’s safety features have been updated. Launched in late 2017 with ASA 1.0, it was then given ASA 2.0 in mid 2020. Now comes ASA 3.0.

    Brand new features include adaptive cruise control, lane keeping assist, blind spot monitor and rear cross traffic alert on the AV variant. That’s Level 2 semi-autonomous driving, on a Myvi! The only downer to the ACC is that, like with the Ativa, it only works between 30 and 125 km/h, so there’s no low-speed follow or traffic jam assist just yet.

    Other variants, except for the base model, also get an upgraded ASA 3.0. The AEB or autonomous emergency braking function now works at up to 120 km/h, and it can also detect both motorcycles and bicycles. The cameras can detect cars at night too this time.

    Also new to the Myvi is auto high beam, standard fit except on the base variant. There are seat belt reminders for all seats too, including the rear passengers. Airbag count is the same as before – four for lower variants and six for the rest. Elsewhere, electronic stability control is standard across the board.

    Lastly, the prices. With all the enhancements and new features, it’s inevitable that the Myvi would be more expensive than before. There are now five variants, starting at RM45,700 for the 1.3 G. You can then add on ASA 3.0 to the 1.3 G, or 1.3 G+ if you will, which brings it to RM47,700.

    A new variant, the 1.5 X goes for RM49,900, while the 1.5 H is priced at RM53,900. Finally, the top-of-the-line 1.5 AV stands at RM58,800, all prices being on-the-road without insurance. The top two variants have seen their prices go up by RM4k and RM6k respectively, which is a big amount in this price range. However, you get quite a bit in return, with new looks, extra tech and a brand new gearbox.

    Mind you, these prices are with zero SST, so by July 2022, we’ll have the Myvi breaching the RM60k mark. But, believe it or not, the current AV still wouldn’t be the most expensive Myvi to date, as the Myvi Extreme from 2011 was already priced at around RM62k.

    So, what do you think of the new Myvi? By all accounts, it again sets a new standard for everyone else to follow, but do share your thoughts with us in the comments section.

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5 AV

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5 H

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5 AV official images

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5 H official images

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi 1.5 X official images

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi 1.3 G with PSDA official images

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi features, official images

    GALLERY: 2022 Perodua Myvi GearUp accessories

     
     
 
 
 

Latest Fuel Prices

PETROL
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Last Updated 26 Jan 2023