Proton Iriz 2022

  • REVIEW: 2022 Proton Persona, Iriz facelift – fr RM40k

    The year’s biggest launch is undoubtedly the 2022 Perodua Myvi facelift. But here to give the King a run for its money are the latest Proton Iriz and Persona facelift, both of which were launched in August.

    Prices for the Iriz start from RM40,300 for the base Standard, rising up to RM47,100 for the Executive and topping out at RM54,000 for the Active. The Persona, meanwhile, starts from RM45,800 for the 1.6 Standard, RM50,800 for the 1.6 Executive, to RM55,800 for the 1.6 Premium variant.

    The hatch soldiers on with the same two VVT engines as before. Base models get a 1.3 litre four-pot that makes 95 PS at 5,750 rpm and 120 Nm of torque at 4,000 rpm, while the 1.6 litre mill continues to serve out 109 PS at 5,750 rpm and 150 Nm at 4,000 rpm. A revised Punch CVT is standard – the manual is no longer available, just like the Myvi. The Persona, on the other hand, is only available with the 1.6 litre mill.

    Watch our video to find out what we think of the updated pair. You can also browse CarBase.my to check out their equipment and specifications in greater detail, or even compare them against the Myvi. You may also click here to see the hatch and sedan compared side by side.

    GALLERY: 2022 Proton Iriz Active

    GALLERY: 2022 Proton Persona Premium

     
     
  • 2022 Proton Iriz vs Persona facelifts – new Malaysian hatchback and sedan get compared side by side

    Proton launched the facelifted Iriz and Persona in August this year, and we’re now bringing you a side-by-side gallery of both in their range-topping guises. In the case of the Iriz, it is the Active which is priced at RM54,800, while the Persona is represented in Premium specification that goes for RM55,800 – these are on-the-road prices without insurance and factor in the ongoing 100% sales tax exemption for locally-assembled (CKD) cars.

    Prior to the latest facelift, the Iriz had its own front fascia where a full-width chrome strip plunges downwards to cradle the Proton emblem. This is different from the Persona of the time that has its chrome strip running down the inner edges of the headlamps and across the base of the grille, which also comes with a different inlay compared to the hatchback.

    With the latest models, both now carry a nearly identical front-end that features Proton’s Infinite Weave grille with the latest round badge. There is still a slight difference though, as the Persona has a chrome grille frame, while the Iriz has a black upper and red lower similar to the X50.

    2022 Proton Iriz Active (left), Persona Premium (right)

    Lower down, the bumper has also been redesigned, with a broader lower grille and slimmer corner air intakes that house the LED daytime running light strips. As for the rear, it’s largely the same as per the previous facelift, but the bumper strip is now red instead of chrome on the Iriz – the Persona keeps the chrome.

    The Active variant is exclusive to the hatchback and comes with SUV-style cues for a more rugged vibe. These include black plastic cladding, silver skid plates on the bumpers, silver roof rails, a black roof and side skirts, while the lower intake at the front is treated to a silver surround and a honeycomb mesh.

    As mentioned in our initial launch post, wheel sizes have gone up an inch across the board, so the two cars you see here are wearing 16-inch alloys, with those on the Iriz being unique to the Active with their two-tone, multi-spoke design.

    2022 Proton Iriz Active (left), Persona Premium (right)

    Moving inside, it’s again a case of similar but not identical, as both sport a revamped dashboard with a freestanding touchscreen measuring eight inches. The infotainment system in the range toppers come with the Geely Key User Interface (GKUI) and an eSIM for online navigation, music streaming, WiFi connectivity and the “Hi Proton” voice control system.

    The placement of the screen forces the centre air vents, previously on either side of the head unit, downwards, sandwiching the hazard light and door lock buttons in the middle. Further down, there’s the manual air-conditioning controls and three USB ports instead of just one, with another being added near the rear-view mirror to make it easier to fit a dash cam.

    Elsewhere, there’s a new centre console with a cleaner, one-piece design and houses the gear lever, three cupholders as well as switches for the front parking sensors, stability control and a new Eco drive mode. Joining this revision is a much-clamoured armrest, two more USB ports at the back of the console and a redesigned steering wheel airbag boss.

    2022 Proton Iriz Active (left), Persona Premium (right)

    Like the front-ends of both models, the furnishings differ between the two, with the Iriz getting black, part-leather seats (with “Active” embroidered on the headrests), red seat belts, alloy pedals and red accents for some trim pieces. By comparison, the Persona goes for the classy look, receiving brown leatherette upholstery, normal black seat belts and silver trim instead.

    The Iriz and Persona variants pictured here are powered by a 1.6 litre naturally-aspirated four-cylinder VVT petrol engine that delivers 109 PS at 5,750 rpm and 150 Nm of torque at 4,000 rpm. The mill drives the front wheels via a Punch CVT, which is the only transmission available – the previous five-speed manual has been dropped.

    While the 1.6 litre engine is the only engine fitted across the Persona range, the base Iriz variant – the Standard – can be had with a 1.3 litre VVT unit that makes 95 PS at 5,750 rpm and 120 Nm, also paired with a CVT.

    GALLERY: 2022 Proton Iriz Active

    GALLERY: 2022 Proton Persona Premium

     
     
  • 2022 Proton Iriz, Persona facelift – why still no AEB?

    One of the big questions on people’s minds during the launch of the facelifted 2022 Proton Iriz and Persona was why did they still not come with autonomous emergency braking. After all, even perennial laggard Perodua has bucked up and offered active safety features – including AEB – on its bread-and-butter Myvi, so the once-leading B-segment models are falling further and further behind the curve.

    The discussion surrounding AEB on the Iriz and Persona is nothing new – even during the Iriz’s original launch back in 2014, Proton was already testing a prototype with LG’s Advanced Drive Assistance System (ADAS) camera, showing that there were clear plans to implement the technology. And yet still, seven years after, there’s no sign of it. Eyebrows were already raised when AEB was given a miss during the first facelift in 2019, but the omission is particularly glaring now.

    We posed the question during last week’s roundtable interview with the cars’ vehicle programme executive Adzrai Aziz Ibrahim. He said that with the limited budget available for the project, the team had to prioritise the features that it thought customers would appreciate.

    “We did a benchmark, the Japanese OEMs have all these high-spec ADAS features, and even the other competitor [Perodua] has some ADAS features that it has marketed. But we had a constraint – we didn’t want to increase the cost of the car so that we could maintain the selling price and give more value to the customer; we had to be careful about what we wanted to add to the car,” he said.

    The Iriz was tested with ADAS as early as 2014

    Adzrai added that the safety improvements were focused on improving crash protection, in order for the Iriz and Persona to retain their five-star rating in the ASEAN NCAP 2017-2020 protocol. “Firstly, we had to see if we could meet the latest ASEAN NCAP protocol. So we added side airbags to all variants, seat belt reminders, and this got us to achieve the latest standards – our protection in terms of occupant safety in a crash is good. We didn’t need these additional [ADAS] features to [get a five-star rating].

    “So we [then] had to decide, do we want to put in [ADAS] or do we put other things that customers will eventually use? We balanced out our investments – we met the ASEAN NCAP 2020 [protocols], so we needed to spend our money on more useful things for the customer.”

    Elaborating on the potential cost of adding ADAS features, Adzrai made a distinction between the Perodua’s simpler camera-based system (with collision warning and partial AEB) and a more advanced radar-based package that would add features like adaptive cruise control to the mix. We should point out that Perodua itself offers camera-based adaptive cruise control on the Ativa (as does Honda on the City and new Civic), so a radar isn’t strictly necessary for implementing additional features.

    “There are two ways [to implement ADAS]. We have full ADAS, which is what Toyota and Honda are applying on their cars, and then there’s mid-level ADAS, which only gives you indicators and buzzers with a camera [to detect obstacles] and [offers] limited functionality.

    “I cannot share with you the [total] cost of doing this, but full ADAS will definitely go beyond RM2,000 in terms of the [cost of] components to be added to the car. It also requires an update in the electrical and electronic architecture, because [the system] needs to communicate [with the car]. So that’s a big investment.

    “For [mid-level ADAS] with a camera and warnings, that is doable, just like what Perodua is doing. But currently, we are still in the research phase. We are trying to determine what is the best solution in this segment, with the price that we want to sell and the additional cost we need to add to our cars. If we feel that these features are necessary in the future, we will introduce them.”

    Adzrai said that while other software features like the expanded “Hi Proton” voice control function also required updates to the electrical architecture, they did not require a comprehensive revamp, reducing the cost required. “Things like voice control are independent; they do not require a redevelopment of the entire car, because they only operate in their own unit, so the cost of [upgrading] is not high.

    “We were able to expand the functionality to the [driver’s] window and air-con because the ability to signal to [those components] is available in the unit. So we were able to apply these items without incurring a lot of investment and we could just tap into [the system] accordingly.”

    Later, when asked if Proton will at least consider adding blind spot monitoring and rear cross traffic alert, Adzrai said, “We do [have plans]. We are looking at these two functions in particular, and when these items are more cost effective for us to apply to our cars, then we will implement them. Maybe they will be added in a future update; for sure, we will fit them to new models. But yes, we are looking at it – mainly these two functions – if we can apply them in the most cost-effective manner.”

    Of course, you can make up your own mind on whether safety features like AEB are vital at this price range, and it’s true that Proton does not have an infinite amount of money to spend on these ageing vehicles – especially given the Iriz’s relatively low sales volumes.

    There’s also the unavoidable fact that because the Iriz and Persona are homegrown products, Proton would have to develop an ADAS system in-house instead of pilfering from Geely’s parts bin, whereas Perodua can simply take plug-and-play parts directly from Daihatsu. Still, there’s no denying that even basic systems like the one in the Myvi not only save lives but also thousands of ringgit in accident repairs – you can’t put a price on that, no matter how Proton tries to spin it.

    Even the Perodua Myvi 1.3 X, priced under RM47,000, is now available with AEB

    And make no mistake, customers are sitting up and taking notice. You only have to look at Perodua expanding the availability of its Advanced Safety Assist (ASA) suite to even the cheaper 1.3 litre models of the Myvi to know how much buyers value their safety these days. An ASA-equipped Myvi can now be had for under RM47,000, so it’s not like AEB is only for the rich.

    Ironically, Proton updating the Iriz and Persona to pass an ASEAN NCAP protocol that expired last year shows just how far it has lagged behind. It’s telling that the company rushed to crash test its cars a full eight months before actually putting them on sale, because it’s highly unlikely it would have retained a five-star rating under the 2021-2025 protocol (which places a greater emphasis on active safety).

    Meanwhile, the Perodua Ativa – which offers AEB as standard – breezed through its crash test this year, becoming the first five-star car under the new protocol. Again, everyone is entitled to their opinion, but at least in terms of safety, we think Proton has missed the mark with the new Iriz and Persona.

    GALLERY: 2022 Proton Iriz 1.6 Active


    GALLERY: 2022 Proton Persona 1.6 Premium

     
     
  • GALLERY: 2022 Proton Iriz Active in Malaysia – RM54k

    Last month saw the introduction of the facelifted 2022 Proton Iriz, complete with the new crossover-style Active variant. At the time, we only had official photos to go on (as well as some live phone images from dealer Regal Motors), but with showrooms now open again, we can finally bring you a full gallery of the range-topping B-segment hatchback.

    The entire Iriz range is now more expensive than before, although the extra cost is largely offset by increased equipment. Prices start from RM40,300 for the base 1.3 Standard CVT, rising up to RM47,100 for the 1.3 Executive CVT and topping out at RM54,000 for the 1.6 Active CVT.

    For the uninitiated, the starting price appears to have gone up quite a bit more, with the Iriz previously starting from RM36,200. However, that figure was for the 1.3 Standard manual, which has been dropped. Compared to the outgoing models, the 1.3 Standard CVT is RM1,200 more expensive, while the 1.6 Executive CVT is RM1,100 costlier. The 1.6 Active CVT takes over from the old Premium and is pricier to the tune of RM4,100. Eagle-eyed readers will notice that the 1.3 Executive CVT has also been discontinued.

    The figures listed are on-the-road without insurance, inclusive of the sales and service tax (SST), valid until December 31. Next year, the prices will go up to RM40,800 for the Standard, RM47,800 for the Executive and RM54,800 for the Active. As usual, the Iriz comes with a five-year/150,000 km warranty, a five-year free data package at one gigabyte a month (Active only) and three times free labour for servicing.

    As previously reported, the Iriz has received a comprehensive makeover inside and out, which it shares with the also-facelifted Persona. For the first time, the two models come with the same front end, consisting of a revised grille (the full-width trim strip no longer plunges downwards to wrap the Proton emblem, which is also now round), a broader lower grille and slimmer corner air intakes that house the LED daytime running light strips on the Executive and Active models.

    Differentiating the Iriz from the Persona is a gloss black (instead of chrome) grille strip and an X50-aping lower grille surround. The rear bumper and black tailgate garnish from the 2019 facelift has been retained, but the bumper strip is now red instead of the previous chrome. The entire range has also received upsized alloy wheels, with the Standard going up to 15 inches and the Executive now rolling on 16s.

    The Active, which derives its name from a concept shown back in 2014, gets a more rugged look with black plastic cladding and silver skid plates on the front and rear bumpers and side skirts, plus a silver surround and a sportier honeycomb mesh cover for the lower grille.

    But the most striking features are the chunky fender extensions, replete with Satria GTi-style fake Allen bolt heads. The Active is also the only Iriz model to feature the new LED headlights (in a darkened finish compared to the Persona 1.6 Premium’s), while a black roof, silver roof rails and unique 16-inch two-tone multi-spoke alloys complete the look.

    Inside, the changes are far-reaching and include a new freestanding head unit, which on the Executive and Active models incorporates a larger eight-inch touchscreen. The Active is the only model to come with the Geely Key User Interface (GKUI) and an eSIM for online navigation, music streaming, WiFi connectivity and the “Hi Proton” voice control system.

    The interface has seen a slight redesign for 2021, with users now being able to control the driver’s side window and air-conditioning with their voice; the controls for the latter have also been moved up to the display. Of course, you can still use the physical knobs down below, and the big change here is the move to a digital air-con system with new knobs, buttons and LCD display. No automatic climate control function here, but you do get an N95 cabin filter as standard, as before.

    Further down, you now get three USB ports instead of just the one before, while another has sprouted near the rear-view mirror (no longer frameless, sadly), making it easier for users to fit a dash cam. The central tunnel is also all new, with a cleaner one-piece design and a silver strip running around its perimeter. It also now houses the switches for the front parking sensors, stability control and the new Eco mode (more on that later), along with no less than three cupholders in various sizes.

    Those who have been complaining about the lack of an armrest have gotten their prayers answered with a full-sized soft-touch item that hides some storage space down below. The two USB ports for rear passengers have been moved to the back of this console (yes, the Iriz has no less than six ports in total), while up above are new LED map lights taken from the Saga.

    The steering wheel airbag boss has also been redesigned, with a crease running across the lower half and the new Proton roundel. The badge can also be found on the alloy wheel centre caps, although the engine cover and the imprints on the windscreens and windows still feature the old badge.

    In terms of furnishings, the Iriz retains its black headlining and pillars (rather than the beige items of the Persona), as well as black fabric upholstery on the Standard model and faux leather on the Executive. The Active gets black part-leather seats with a circuit board-like pattern on the cloth portion, together with red stitching and the “Active” script embroidered on the seats and door cards.

    Other bits that are exclusive to the Active are the alloy pedals and the red trim on the air vent surrounds, central tunnel, air-con and steering wheel controls and instrument cluster dial rings. You even get red seat belts, just like on a Mercedes-AMG model or a Honda Civic Type R.

    As standard, the Iriz comes with a Bluetooth-enabled radio, the aforementioned digital air-con controls and two speakers, the front parking sensors now being exclusive to the 1.6 litre models. The X70-style leather-wrapped gearlever, previously exclusive to the Premium, is now fitted to all models.

    The 1.6 Executive adds LED daytime running lights, a tailgate spoiler, keyless entry, push-button start, auto-folding door mirrors, auto headlights, a colour multi-info display, four speakers and a reverse camera. The Active model is the only one with LED headlights, a multifunction steering wheel and the eSIM with voice control functionality, plus all the equipment mentioned earlier.

    Safety-wise, the Iriz has been improved somewhat, now available with at least four airbags (the Executive comes with curtain airbags as well, bumping up the count to six). However, the car still isn’t offered with autonomous emergency braking even on the Active, putting it a step behind the Perodua Myvi in this regard.

    Other bits of standard kit include stability control, hill start assist and rear ISOFIX child seat anchors, as well as new rear seat belt reminders on the Active. Retested last year under the previous 2017-2020 protocol, the Iriz carries a five-star ASEAN NCAP rating.

    Under the bonnet, the Iriz soldiers on with the same VVT four-cylinder engines as before. The 1.3 litre unit makes 95 PS at 5,750 rpm and 120 Nm of torque at 4,000 rpm while the 1.6 litre mill continues to serve out 109 PS at 5,750 rpm and 150 Nm at 4,000 rpm.

    The big change here is the transmission. Proton hasn’t switched to the Saga‘s four-speed automatic gearbox as previously rumoured, sticking to the Punch CVT used since 2014. However, the stepless unit has received several changes over the years, most recently a thorough hardware refresh for the 2019 facelift.

    This time, the changes are mostly software-related, made to improve the car’s drivability and fuel efficiency. Firstly, there’s a new stepped-ratio SAT mode that engages when the throttle is pushed beyond a certain threshold. This enables the transmission to “kickdown” like an automatic gearbox and hold on to a specific ratio before “shifting up”.

    Proton says that the new function improves and quietens the noise the engine makes when accelerating and smoothens out the acceleration itself. The company has also added a Neutral Idle Control (NIC) that disconnects the clutch when the car is stationary, lowering the engine’s idle speed, eliminating shift shock when shifting out of Park and reducing overall noise, vibration and harshness (NVH).

    Last but not least is a proper Eco mode (completely separate from the Eco Driving Assist indicator, which merely lights up when you’re driving efficiently), which disables SAT and disconnects the clutch off-throttle at speeds under 70 km/h, allowing the car to coast. Proton claims a real-world reduction in fuel use of between seven and ten per cent according to in-house testing.

    These improvements, plus a retuned ECU, allow the Iriz to deliver an NEDC-rated fuel consumption figure of 6.7 litres per 100 km, with the taller (due to the larger wheels and roof rails) and heavier Active registering 7.0 litres per 100 km. That’s a significant drop of 12% and seven per cent respectively over the 2019 model’s 7.5 litres per 100 km.

    The standard Iriz lineup is available in five colours – Snow White, Armour Silver, Jet Grey, Ocean Blue and Ruby Red. The Executive variant is also offered with a Citric Orange option, while the Active drops Ruby Red in favour of the X50’s Passion Red paint.

     
     
  • 2022 Proton Iriz vs Perodua Myvi – we compare the maintenance costs of both over five years/100,000 km

    We recently covered the maintenance cost of the new 2022 Proton Iriz facelift, which has increased compared to the outgoing 2019 model. Over five years or 100,000 km, it will now cost you RM3,583.17 if you keep to Proton’s official service schedule, which is RM531.37 more than before.

    So, how does the new total compare to the other B-segment hatchback that Malaysians are fond of, the Perodua Myvi? Well, we pulled data on the official service schedule of the Myvi and laid out all the figures so you can see the differences for yourself.

    Before proceeding further, it should be noted that the 2019 Iriz was slightly cheaper to maintain compared to the Myvi, costing RM3,051.80 instead of RM3,163.31 over five years. With the new model, this is no longer the case, with the gap between the two now being RM419.86.

    As we discovered previously, the main reasons for the increased maintenance cost of the Iriz are the more frequent N95 cabin filter and radiator coolant changes, along with their respective labour charges, with everything else remaining pretty much unchanged from before.

    The Myvi doesn’t have a N95 cabin filter, and it uses a regular cabin filter that is changed thrice over five years. Moreover, the Perodua hatchback only gets its radiator coolant changed twice compared to the three times needed for the Iriz. The less-frequent service items contribute to the lower maintenance cost, as do a few items that are cheaper in terms of parts.

    On the flipside, the Myvi requires fully-synthetic engine oil and iridium spark plugs for its engine, both of which cost more over five years compared to the Iriz. The Myvi’s four-speed automatic transmission also needs more frequent oil changes when compared to the Iriz’s CVT, which only requires one at 60,000 km.

    2022 Proton Iriz service schedule (top), 2019 Iriz (bottom); click to enlarge

    It should also be noted that while some service items like the engine air filter are changed less frequently with the Myvi, Perodua does recommend replacements to be made every 20,000 km under its optional Pro Care programme.

    Other service items listed in Pro Care include brake fluid changes, tyre servicing (alignment, balancing and rotation), spark plug changes and air-con major service. If you factor in all the Pro Care options on top of the standard scheduled service items, the total is noticeably more.

    As always, overall running costs go beyond more than just what you pay at the service centre. You also need to consider fuel consumption that can differ based on driving style and consumables, with the latter being things like tyres.

    Perodua Myvi service schedule with Pro Care options; click to enlarge

    The round, rubber doughnuts should cost more for the Iriz, as its wheel sizes have gone up gone up from 15 to 16 inches for Executive and Premium variants, while the Myvi maxes out at 15 inches. Other consumables include brake pads, shock absorbers and batteries are also factors in overall running costs.

    So, there you have it. The Myvi is cheaper to maintain over five years compared to the Iriz, but keep in mind that if you spread the difference over five years, it’s only about RM84 more per year for the latter, so it’s not that much more yearly.

     
     
  • 2022 Proton Persona, Iriz maintenance costs increased compared to 2019 models – what are the changes?

    Proton recently gave the Iriz and Persona their second facelifts earlier this month, with both benefiting from styling updates as well as equipment changes. The national carmaker’s B-segment models also have a more streamlined variant line-up this time around, with the Iriz in particular gaining a new, SUV-inspired Active option.

    These revisions are accompanied by price hikes that range from RM1,100 to RM4,100, depending on the model and chosen variant, but there’s more to add as well. Looking at Proton’s latest maintenance schedules, we discover that both models have higher upkeep costs compared to their 2019 predecessors.

    As such, we’ve compiled the official maintenance costs for the 2022 and 2019 Iriz and Persona to determine why this is the case. For parity, we’re only comparing variants equipped with a 1.6 litre VVT DOHC engine and CVT, the latter now being the only available transmission for both models.

    Given that both cars are mechanically identical, the maintenance costs for the 2019 duo are identical, and this is also the case for the 2022 pair. However, you can see in the prepared table that the 2022 models cost RM3,583.17 to maintain over five years or 100,000 km, which is more than the RM3,051.80 for the 2019 models.

    Looking at the itemised list, we find that the 2022 models require their N95 cabin filter to be replaced every 20,000 km. This isn’t exactly new, as Proton previously announced in July last year that all its cars will come with a N95 cabin filter as standard, so the first facelift models had it then.

    However, when we reported on the maintenance cost of the 2019 Persona (which extends to the Iriz), cabin filter changes were not mandatory in the maintenance schedule at the time. With five replacements now required over five years for the 2022 models, the total cost of the N95 cabin filters amount to RM295 excluding labour, which makes up the bulk of the total increase here.

    2022 Proton Iriz/Persona service schedule (top), 2019 Iriz/Persona (bottom); click to enlarge

    It should also be noted that Proton service centres would usually recommend periodic cabin filter changes even for the 2019 models (though not mandatory), so in actuality, the difference here is not as big as it may first appear.

    Another variance observed is the 2022 models require more frequent radiator coolant changes, as it now happens every 30,000 km instead of just once at 90,000 km for the 2019 models – a sensible change. These two, more frequent service items, along with their labour charges, form the main difference between maintenance costs for the 2022 and 2019 models, with everything else being the same or just a cent more.

    Of course, while it may cost RM531.37 more to maintain the 2022 models over five years compared to the 2019 models, when split across that timespan, it’s only about RM106 more per year. Keep in mind that besides preventative maintenance costs, things like fuel consumption can also affect the cost of your individual ownership. Meanwhile, consumables like tyres will cost more than before as the wheel sizes have gone up (from 15 to 16 inches for Executive and Premium variants), and there are other things such as brake pads, shock absorbers and batteries.

     
     
  • FIRST LOOK: 2022 Proton Iriz facelift, RM40k to RM54k

    So, the 2022 Proton Iriz facelift has just been launched. It’s a pretty major update with new lights and bumpers, as well as a rather opinion-dividing crossover-styled Active variant, a surprisingly fresh interior revamp and the controversial choice of sticking to the Punch CVT gearbox.

    There’s also no more manual option, no upgrades to the safety features, and prices have actually gone up a bit. In short, there are some pretty positive things and a few not-so-good things with this facelift, so let’s go through them. We’ll only be taking a look at the Iriz range, by the way, but do stay tuned for another piece on the Persona that’s coming soon.

    The Iriz has been around for seven years, which makes it an old car by many standards. Most other cars that were launched in 2014 have already been replaced by a whole new generation by now, such as the Honda City, Mazda 3, Mercedes-Benz GLA, BMW X5, and so on. But for the Iriz, we get yet another facelift.

    And yes, we know there are also a few models even older than the Proton still on sale today, like the Perodua Alza, Toyota Avanza, Mazda 6 and Ford Ranger. So yeah, it’s not the only one.

    If you’ve been following the model closely, you’ll know that this isn’t the Iriz’s first refresher. It’s not even the second. At launch, the Iriz was a good-looking car with great specs, but it was marred by a less-than-ideal CVT transmission, let’s put it as that. The response was slow, it was on the loud side and a little jerky. Far from perfect, really.


    The original 2014 Iriz

    Come 2017, the Iriz Refinement was launched. This version looked pretty much the same as the original, but under the skin was a much-improved package, especially the CVT. Like the codename, it was a much more refined experience. It received new engine mountings, a new exhaust system and it all worked. It was significantly quieter, too, with a much better response than before.

    Then came the 2019 Iriz. Proton, now firmly under Geely’s influence, gave its B-segment hatchback a striking visual upgrade, complete with an entirely different face and welcome tech injections from Proton and Geely’s more upmarket models. This time, the main focus was to improve interior build quality, while further refining the car’s NVH.

    Fast forward another two years, and here we are with the current facelift. This round, it’s a much more substantial update, with the Iriz getting another set of new clothes on the outside and a near unrecognisable fresh interior. There are various improvements beyond that too, but we’ll get to that further down.

    What’s clear here, though, is that Proton has shown great perseverance with the Iriz, continuously improving it over the years, despite it being a relative sales flop. On that, this was originally planned as Proton’s answer to the King of Kings, the Perodua Myvi. Obviously, it missed the lofty target. By a huge margin.

    Still, it’s good to see Proton sticking to it, instead of just quietly forgetting about it like it did with the Suprima S. And the Perdana. And the Preve. And the Satria Neo.

    Anyway, back to the 2022 Proton Iriz facelift. There’s plenty to cover, so let’s start with the styling. There are two very distinct versions of the Iriz now – the Standard and Executive variants get a new set of front grille and bumper, and it’s definitely nicer than before, especially the grille.

    This is a fresh new look, and the red bow on the grille gives it a nice family tie-in with the X50, as to suggest that these two are targeted to the young and trendy crowd. Comparatively, the Persona facelift has a more elegant look with more chrome work up front, and even more so the brown interior inside, matching the more mature X70.

    The effort Proton put in to differentiate the Iriz and Persona is commendable, even though they are now sharing the same face for the very first time. They are also the first homegrown Proton models (as in one not based on Geely models) to wear the latest Proton logo.

    Still, you can see that the bonnet has a pointed cutout to fit the old Proton crest, but if you take a step back, we think it all fits quite nicely. This is now the third Proton logo to appear on the Iriz – just goes to show how long the model has been in service.

    That said, strictly from the front, it simply does not look like a seven-year-old design. Even on the side, the new wheels work quite well to freshen up the ageing body, plus the distinctive lower side blades still look as good now as it did the day it was born. Some of us think that Proton pulls this trick off better than the Porsche Macan, which, incidentally, is yet another car still in service that is older than the Iriz.

    But, once we get to the back, the 2022 Iriz falls a little flat. It’s pretty much exactly the same as the 2019 model, save for the red line at the bottom. Proton knows full well that this isn’t exciting enough, to the point where it didn’t even release any official photos of the Standard or Executive rear end.

    The single image of the back that they did provide is of the new Active variant, which is a bit controversial, styling-wise. Now, the new Iriz Active replaces the Premium variant as the new range topper, and it gets a crossover-inspired styling package with chunky black plastic mouldings all around.

    The recent market shift towards SUVs has certainly played a role here, very much like the similarly-designed Perodua Axia Style from 2019. Now, before you say Proton is just copying Perodua here, remember that Proton had the idea of a crossover-styled Iriz right from the very beginning, showing off the Iriz Active concept just days after the initial launch back in 2014.

    Personally though, I much prefer the look of that original concept over the actual Iriz Active that we’re getting now. That being a concept, it had really cool features like next-gen LED glow DRLs and tail lights, a floating roof look that is all the rage now, a digital instrument cluster and a Tesla-style massive centre screen. It’s too bad it had to be toned down for production, even seven years down the road.

    Again, the Iriz Active is an opinion-dividing model. Some people love it, while others absolutely hate it. For me, I fall somewhere in the middle, because in some parts, I think it’s a very clever redesign. It’s a somewhat easy way to create a completely fresh looking car without changing the basic shape of it, and for the most part I think Proton Design has pulled it off.

    Here, the Iriz gets a unique silver frame up front that doubles up as a decorative skid plate, a honeycomb insert, rugged overfenders all around, matching two-tone multi-spoke wheels, and roof rails at the top. Beyond that, it’s the same old Iriz. Officially it’s 10 mm taller than the standard car, but that’s all from the roof rails. The ride height is exactly the same as the rest.

    While it’s clearly not an SUV, it does give off a little bit of that desirable, fashionable vibe that you get from a modern crossover. The visual package gives off a significantly different look overall from relatively simple additions. In a minimal effort, maximum gain standpoint, the result is a huge success.

    Of course, not everything is likeable. The wheel arch mouldings are a bit too chunky, a bit too thick, and the way they stretch towards the front and rear corners looks a little forced. Also, the tiny bit of “detached” trim on the rear doors look really out of place, though of course it’s not the only car to have these issues. The Mazda CX-30’s plastic fenders are even more exaggerated, and the Peugeot 2008 had the same door cutout too.

    If you ever wonder how the fenders would look like had they been finished in body colour, well, you have Theophilus Chin to thank. This looks so much better in my opinion. Even the silly GTi-inspired Allen bolt heads around the fenders make sense now, giving it a bit of that Rocket Bunny look. So if you really don’t like the overfenders, here’s something you can easily do. Again, minimal effort, maximum gain.

    One thing that hasn’t been mentioned yet is the new LED headlights on the Iriz Active, finally matching the Perodua Myvi. But while the highway king has it fitted on all variants, here, only the top Iriz gets it. The lower models carry on with lame halogen reflector lights, which are so outdated now. Seriously, once you’ve driven a modern car with LED headlights, going back to halogens feels like you’ve gone back in time.

    Another thing exclusive to the Iriz Active is the Goodyear Triplemax 2 tyres. The Executive, even though it also runs upsized 16-inch wheels with the same tyre profile, gets fitted with Atlas tyres, just like the Saga.

    As for colour options, Proton has gone crazy this time with no less than seven options, including the Citric Orange and Passion Red taken from the X50. It’s nice to see a good selection of bright and vibrant colour options instead of the usual white and silver. For me, I’m loving my orange X50 and I think it looks just unique here on the Iriz.

    Now, finally, we get to the interior, where the changes are even more important. Right off the bat, you’ll notice the near unrecognisable dashboard, making this feel like so much more than a mere facelift.

    The upper central pod has been completely redesigned, now featuring a modern looking freestanding screen. To accommodate the larger screen, the air-con vents have been moved down, arranged in a more conventional horizontal layout. A byproduct of this change is that the vents will hopefully be allowed to direct air towards your face, rather than directly at your fingers on the steering wheel like the previous design.

    Further down, the air-con controls are all new too. Gone are the loose-feeling triple rotary dials, replaced by digital controls that are similar to the ones on the X50. Now, it should be noted that they are not exactly the same, and certainly incompatible with those seen in the Lotus Emira, in case you’re thinking of having them retrofitted on the cheap.

    Also, while the controls are digital, the air-conditioning is still a manual system, so no automatic climate control here. But, at least you still get Proton’s N95 cabin filter as standard, which is good to have today. There’s still no rear vents either, but that’s also the case with all cars this size. Just get a set of good window tint, and your rear passengers will be fine.

    Just below the air-con controls is a set of three USB ports to charge your mobile devices. The Iriz now has a total of six USB ports – two more for the rear passengers and one cleverly tucked behind the rear-view mirror. Just like on the X70, this one is meant to directly power your dash cam, so you no longer need to route the power cable all around the headliner. The map lights are new too, now featuring LED lamps like on the Saga. It’s all the little things, really.

    Let’s move on to the centre tunnel, which is entirely new. It’s far simpler and neater now, with three buttons up front for the front parking sensors, electronic stability control and a new Eco mode for the transmission. The gearlever is a carryover from the 2019 model, but it’s now standard across the range.

    Behind that is the handbrake, flanked by a long row of cubbyholes and cupholders. Should be handy to hold your wallets, keys and other loose items, something the previous models struggled with. Also a welcome addition is a centre armrest, which should please a lot of people.

    Other new additions include the steering boss cover, now with the uncaged tiger logo. This is actually a significant change for the Iriz, as previous models have always carried the old flat logo, even after the exterior moved on to the 3D logo from 2017. Now, finally, the interior has caught up.

    Overall, it’s actually pretty amazing how Proton has managed to modernise the dashboard to this degree, despite the obvious limitations it had to work with. If you look closely enough, the entire dashboard is still built off the same old design, but the new parts really do transform the interior quite dramatically. It’s rare that a facelift update is this thorough inside.

    The one thing that is showing its age a little is the steering wheel design itself. New logo aside, it’s a far cry from more modern designs in the X70 and X50 that look one or two generations newer. However, one small gripe we have is the removal of the frameless rear-view mirror first fitted on the 2019 model.

    As you can tell by now, all the red splashes in the interior are exclusive to the Iriz Active, which also adds on sport pedals, part leather seats and my absolute favourite – bright red seatbelts like on Mercedes-AMG and Honda Type R models.

    Lower models have all the red bits on the dashboard painted silver. The Executive gets full leatherette seats, while the Standard gets full fabric seats and unfortunately, the same old standard audio head unit, which is absolutely terrible.

    The Iriz Active is the only one to get the fully upgraded GKUI head unit, now featuring a new interface. The “Hi Proton” voice commands are also no longer limited to the onboard navigation and music apps – it can now operate the air-con and window too, just like the Geely-based models.

    However, unlike on the SUV models, asking the system to open the windows will only result in the driver’s side window coming down. Why? Because that’s the only side with an Auto up and down function.

    Mechanically, the engines are exactly the same as before. The 1.3 litre VVT mill still makes 95 PS and 120 Nm, while the 1.6 litre VVT offers 109 PS and 150 Nm. These have not changed at all since the very first Iriz seven years ago, so that’s a little disappointing. But then again, the 1.6 still has a healthy advantage over the Myvi 1.5 in terms of output numbers, so there’s that.

    Transmission-wise, there’s only one option, the Punch CVT. Yes, for the very first time, the Iriz is no longer available with a manual option. It’s sad, but unfortunately, that move is probably a wise business decision by Proton. Why? Nobody is buying manuals anymore. That’s a fact. So why bother making them? Based on recent data shown to us, only 3% of Iriz customers bought the manual. Yeah, just 3%, and you know there aren’t that many Irizes sold anyway, right?

    I personally know first hand how small the demand was for the manual Iriz. When I was buying one last year, I was told that for CVT models, I could get one delivered within a few weeks or a month, depending on the colour option. For the manual, I could choose any colour I want, and it would be ready for delivery like, yesterday. That’s how bad it was.

    So yeah, don’t go blaming Proton for stopping the manuals. Malaysians stopped buying them first. I’m just glad Proton stuck with it for long enough for me to get one for myself. And if you really want one now, I’m sure there are a few pre-facelift manuals lying around somewhere.

    As for the CVT, despite being frowned upon, it’s one of those things that you really need to try out for yourself. I’m sure you’ve heard many negative comments about it. You know, it’s slow, it’s not responsive, it’s loud. But, the next question should be, which Iriz CVT are they referring to? Like I mentioned earlier, Proton has improved the CVT by leaps and bounds over the years.

    The first version had issues, yes, there’s no denying that. But since then, the continuous improvements done to it have been impressive. The last version we drove in 2019 had very decent driving characteristics. Super refined, by far the quietest in the class.

    This 2022 version, while Proton hasn’t publicly said anything about the CVT yet, the people we’ve spoken to within Proton said that a lot of work has been put to further improve it. And this is both in terms of hardware and software, so we’ve been told. It’s now smoother, more efficient, more reliable, the lot.

    You can see that there are proper Eco and Sport driving modes too, which are new. We can’t wait to try it out when test drives are allowed again. And those of you still with doubts on the Iriz CVT, you should too.

    Next, safety. This is traditionally Proton’s strong point, but here and now the Iriz is just about alright. It’s no longer a class leader in this respect. The Iriz was revolutionary back in 2014, being the first in the class, and at the time, the cheapest car to have electronic stability control and six airbags.

    But while other brands have soon caught up and progressed even further, the Iriz has pretty much stagnated. This 2022 version has the same safety features as the seven-year-old original. ESP and six airbags, and still no AEB. The Standard version now has four airbags instead of two. But still, for a 2022 model, we would have expected AEB by now. And so should you.

    After all, this car’s main rival, the Perodua Myvi now offers AEB even on its 1.3 litre model, so clearly Proton is lagging behind with the Iriz. Proton still boasts of a five-star ASEAN NCAP crash safety rating, but it should be known that the result is based on the 2020 testing protocol.

    There’s now a brand new set of tests for 2021 which has a higher focus on active safety features such as AEB and blind spot monitoring. If the Iriz goes through the latest protocol, I’m not quite sure it would get top marks again.

    Now, the only thing left to talk about is pricing. The 2022 Iriz now starts from just over RM40,000, going up to RM54k for the top-spec Active. The starting price has gone up a fair bit, as the previous Iriz came in from just RM36k, but again remember that that was for the manual version.

    For the CVT, both the new Standard and Executive variants are about RM1,000 more expensive than before, which is fair as you do get extra equipment. The Active is now over RM4,000 more than the previous Premium, which can be a bit hard to swallow. But then again, the additional bits and bobs do cost more money, so that’s that.

    More importantly, the Iriz price range is comparatively very similar to the Perodua Myvi, so there’s not much difference between the two, especially if you’re going to take loans. So choosing between the two comes down to preference, not pricing. If you’re planning on buying the new Iriz, let us know which model you will be purchasing in the comments section, below.


    GALLERY: 2022 Proton Iriz 1.6 Executive facelift at showroom
    GALLERY: 2022 Proton Iriz 1.6 Active facelift at showroom

     
     
  • 2022 Proton Iriz facelift launched in Malaysia – new SUV-style Active, LED lights; from RM40k to RM54k

    Proton’s worst-kept secret, the facelifted 2022 Iriz and Persona, has finally been launched today. The second such nip and tuck for the B-segment contenders is a far more thorough revision, adding some significant changes to the exterior, interior and mechanicals.

    Here, we’re focusing on the Iriz hatchback, which is available in 1.3 Standard CVT, 1.6 Executive CVT and 1.6 Active CVT variants – the latter is a new addition for the lineup. Prices start from RM40,300 for the base Standard, rising up to RM47,100 for the Executive and topping out at RM54,000 for the Active.

    The starting price appears to have gone up quite a bit more, with the Iriz previously starting from RM36,200. However, that figure was for the 1.3 Standard manual, which has been dropped. Compared to the outgoing models, the 1.3 Standard CVT is RM1,200 more expensive, while the 1.6 Executive CVT is RM1,100 costlier. The 1.6 Active CVT takes over from the old Premium and is pricier to the tune of RM4,100. Eagle-eyed readers will notice that the 1.3 Executive CVT has also been discontinued.

    The figures listed are on-the-road without insurance, inclusive of the sales and service tax (SST) exemption, valid until December 31. Next year, the prices will go up to RM40,800 for the Standard, RM47,800 for the Executive and RM54,800 for the Active. As usual, the Iriz comes with a five-year/150,000 km warranty, a five-year free data package at one gigabyte a month (Active only) and three times free labour for servicing.

    On the outside, the Iriz shares the same front fascia as the Persona for the first time, so the full-width trim strip no longer plunges downward to wrap the Proton emblem, instead running along the top edge of the grille. Speaking of the emblem, the Iriz and Persona receive the latest round badge first seen on the locally-assembled X70 early last year.

    While both cars share the same Infinite Weave grille this time around, a couple of differences remain. The strip at the top is finished in gloss black instead of chrome on the Persona, while the lower surround is painted red, mirroring the X50.

    Lower down, the bumper has also been redesigned, with a broader lower grille and slimmer corner air intakes that house the LED daytime running light strips on the Executive and Active models. There’s also a grey front lip that adds a bit of aggressiveness to the look. The rear bumper and black tailgate garnish from the 2019 facelift has been retained, but the bumper strip is now red instead of the previous chrome.

    The entire lineup also goes an inch up in wheel sizes – the Standard gets 15-inch alloys that look very similar to the multi-spoke items found on the outgoing Persona, while the Executive moves up to 16-inch rollers that sport a very handsome Y-spoke design, adding 10 mm to the ride height. Both get a full silver finish.

    For 2021, the flagship Iriz now takes the form of the SUV-style Active, drawing its name from a concept shown back in 2014. The rugged makeover consists of black plastic cladding and silver skid plates on the front and rear bumpers and side skirts, with the lower grille also getting a silver surround and a sportier honeycomb mesh cover to match.

    But the most striking features are the chunky fender extensions, replete with Satria GTi-style fake Allen bolt heads. The Active is also the only Iriz model to feature the new LED headlights (in a darkened finish compared to the Persona 1.6 Premium’s), while a black roof, silver roof rails and unique 16-inch two-tone multi-spoke alloys complete the look.

    The interior has seen arguably bigger changes, not least of which being the new freestanding head unit. This pushes the centre air vents downwards, now in a more conventional horizontal layout with the hazard light and door lock buttons in the middle.

    On the Executive and Active variants, the infotainment touchscreen now measures eight inches across, one inch larger than before. While the two displays look very similar, they run on different systems, the Active being the only one with the Geely Key User Interface (GKUI) and an eSIM for online navigation, music streaming, WiFi connectivity and the “Hi Proton” voice control system.

    The interface has seen a slight redesign for 2021, with users now being able to control the driver’s side window and air-conditioning with their voice; the controls for the latter have also been moved up to the display. Of course, you can still use the physical knobs down below, and the big change here is the move to a digital air-con system with new knobs, buttons and LCD display. No automatic climate control function here, but you do get an N95 cabin filter as standard, as before.

    Further down, you now get three USB ports instead of just the one before, while another has sprouted near the rear-view mirror (no longer frameless, sadly), making it easier for users to fit a dash cam. The central tunnel is also all new, with a cleaner one-piece design and a silver strip running around its perimeter. It also now houses the switches for the front parking sensors, stability control and the new Eco mode (more on that later), along with no less than three cupholders in various sizes.

    Those who have been complaining about the lack of an armrest have gotten their prayers answered with a full-sized soft-touch item that hides some storage space down below. The two USB ports for rear passengers have been moved to the back of this console (yes, the Iriz has no less than six ports in total), while up above are new LED map lights taken from the Saga.

    The steering wheel airbag boss has also been redesigned, with a crease running across the lower half and the new Proton roundel. This is no half-hearted rebranding – the badge can also be found on the alloy wheel centre caps, although the imprints on the windscreens and windows still feature the old badge.

    In terms of furnishings, the Iriz retains its black headlining and pillars (rather than the beige items of the Persona), as well as black fabric upholstery on the Standard model and faux leather on the Executive. The Active gets black part-leather seats with a circuit board-like pattern on the cloth portion, together with red stitching and the “Active” script embroidered on the seats and door cards.

    Other bits that are exclusive to the Active are the alloy pedals and the red trim on the air vent surrounds, central tunnel, air-con and steering wheel controls and instrument cluster dial rings. You even get red seat belts, just like on a Mercedes-AMG model or a Honda Civic Type R.

    As standard, the Iriz comes with a Bluetooth-enabled radio, the aforementioned digital air-con controls and two speakers, the front parking sensors now being exclusive to the 1.6 litre models. The X70-style leather-wrapped gearlever, previously exclusive to the Premium, is now fitted to all models.

    The 1.6 Executive adds LED daytime running lights, a tailgate spoiler, keyless entry, push-button start, auto-folding door mirrors, auto headlights, a colour multi-info display, four speakers and a reverse camera. The Active model is the only one with LED headlights, a multifunction steering wheel and the eSIM with voice control functionality, plus all the equipment mentioned earlier.

    Safety-wise, the Iriz has been improved somewhat, now available with at least four airbags (the Executive comes with curtain airbags as well, bumping up the count to six). However, the car still isn’t offered with autonomous emergency braking even on the Active, putting it a step behind the Perodua Myvi in this regard. Other bits of standard kit include stability control, hill start assist and rear ISOFIX child seat anchors. Retested last year under the previous 2017-2020 protocol, the Iriz carries a five-star ASEAN NCAP rating.

    Under the bonnet, the Iriz soldiers on with the same VVT four-cylinder engines as before. The 1.3 litre unit makes 95 PS at 5,750 rpm and 120 Nm of torque at 4,000 rpm while the 1.6 litre mill continues to serve out 109 PS at 5,750 rpm and 150 Nm at 4,000 rpm.

    The big change here is the transmission. No, Proton hasn’t switched to the Saga‘s four-speed automatic gearbox as previously rumoured, sticking to the Punch CVT used since 2014. However, the stepless unit has received several changes over the years, most recently a thorough hardware refresh for the 2019 facelift.

    Click to enlarge

    We understand that this time, the engineers have focused on the software to improve drivability, although no details have been released just yet – we’ll know more once we speak to the R&D team. Notably, the Eco mode is now switchable and looks to no longer be just a light in the instrument cluster to indicate light-footed driving, but an actual drive mode with tangible settings changes for greater efficiency.

    There’s also a new “S” position on the gearlever that replaces the previous “L”, hinting of a sport mode or perhaps even the return of the simulated stepped SAT mode. Last but not least, the five-speed manual that was offered on the base Iriz has been dropped, as mentioned earlier (too bad, purists).

    The standard Iriz lineup is available in five colours – Snow White, Armour Silver, Jet Grey, Ocean Blue and Ruby Red. The Executive variant is also offered with a Citric Orange option, while the Active drops Ruby Red in favour of the X50’s Passion Red paint.

    Click to enlarge

    Here’s the variant breakdown in detail:

    2022 Proton Iriz 1.3 Standard CVT – RM40,300
    Gets as standard:

    Mechanicals

    • 1.3 litre VVT DOHC engine
    • 1,332 cc naturally-aspirated four-cylinder petrol
    • 95 PS at 5,750 rpm, 120 Nm at 4,000 rpm
    • CVT with Eco mode
    • MacPherson struts (front), torsion beam (rear)
    • Ventilated brake discs (front), drums (rear)

    Exterior

    • Halogen reflector headlights
    • LED combination taillights
    • 15-inch alloy wheels with 185/55-section tyres
    • Power-adjustable door mirrors
    • Shark fin antenna
    • Rear wiper

    Interior

    • Urethane steering wheel
    • Leather-wrapped gearknob with silver trim
    • LCD multi-info display
    • Power windows with driver’s side auto down
    • Black fabric seats with manual adjustment
    • 60:40 split-folding rear seats
    • Manual air-conditioning with LCD display
    • Radio/MP3 player with Bluetooth connectivity
    • Two speakers
    • Four front USB ports, two rear

    Safety

    • Four airbags (front, side)
    • ABS with EBD and brake assist
    • Stability control
    • Traction control
    • Hill start assist
    • Rear ISOFIX child seat anchors
    • Rear parking sensors

    2022 Proton Iriz 1.6 Executive CVT – RM47,100

    Adds on:

    Mechanicals

    • 1.6 litre VVT DOHC engine
    • 1,597 cc naturally-aspirated four-cylinder petrol
    • 109 PS at 5,750 rpm, 150 Nm at 4,000 rpm

    Exterior

    • Automatic headlights with follow-me-home function
    • LED daytime running lights
    • 16-inch alloy wheels with 185/55-section tyres
    • Keyless entry

    Interior

    • Push-button start
    • TFT LCD colour multi-info display
    • Driver’s side auto up/down window with anti-pinch
    • Eight-inch touchscreen head unit with smartphone connectivity
    • Four speakers
    • Reverse camera with dynamic guidelines

    Safety

    • Six airbags (front, side, curtain)
    • Front parking sensors

    2021 Proton Iriz 1.6 Active CVT – RM54,000

    Adds on:

    Exterior

    • LED headlights
    • Black body cladding and fender extensions
    • Silver front, side and rear skid plates
    • Honeycomb lower grille
    • Silver roof rails
    • Black roof
    • 16-inch two-tone alloy wheels with 185/55-section tyres

    Interior

    • Leather-wrapped multifunction steering wheel with red trim
    • Part-leather upholstery with red stitching
    • Active logo embroidered on seats and doors
    • Red trim on air vents, centre console, air-con controls and instrument cluster
    • Red seat belts
    • Red floor mat edging
    • Alloy pedals
    • Geely Key User Interface (GKUI)
    • Built-in 4G connectivity with WiFi hotspot
    • Voice control (including windows and air-con), music streaming, live navigation data

    So there you have it, the facelifted 2022 Proton Iriz. What do you think of the litany of upgrades of the latest model? Sound off in the comments after the jump. Oh, and in case you were wondering, some of the images you see below have been provided by Proton Regal Motors in Petaling Jaya. Excuse the quality of the photos – we’ll bring you full, professionally-shot images once lockdown measures have eased. In the meantime, you can browse full specifications and equipment on CarBase.my.





    GALLERY: 2022 Proton Iriz 1.6 Executive facelift at showroom
    GALLERY: 2022 Proton Iriz 1.6 Active facelift at showroom

     
     
 
 
 

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Last Updated 23 Mar 2023