Proton X50

  • Proton X50 sales surpasses 100,000 units in 3 years – officially the fastest-selling SUV in Malaysia ever

    Proton X50 sales surpasses 100,000 units in 3 years – officially the fastest-selling SUV in Malaysia ever

    Proton has announced that its sales tally for the X50 SUV has exceeded 100,000 units (100,210 exactly) since its launch 36 months ago, making it the most popular B-segment SUV in the country.

    The national car company even claims that this is “the shortest time it has taken for any SUV to achieve the benchmark in Malaysia,” which is to say it’s the fastest-selling SUV here ever. This comes after 2,021 units of the X50 were delivered in October 2023, adding up to 26,981 units so far this year.

    Proton’s official count states the X50 got off to a painfully slow start in 2020, selling just 3,787 units between its launch on October 27 and the end of the year. Early adopters waited months to receive their new cars back then, me included. Production ramped up significantly in 2021 and 2022, with sales totalling 28,774 and 40,681 units respectively. Yes, the numbers add up to 100,223 and not 100,210, but that’s the figure Proton is quoting now.

    It has to be said, however, that the Proton X50 is in dire need of a refresh. It’s already a few update cycles behind its Geely Binyue/Coolray donor model, and its sales numbers appear to be slowing down too after a stellar 2022. The latter is to be expected for a model that is now three years old, but an update to stir up excitement couldn’t come soon enough.

    In any case, credit where credit’s due, please join me in wishing the Proton X50 a warm congratulations. Fastest-selling SUV in Malaysia ever, that’s some feat.

     
     
  • Proton X50 R3 launched in Malaysia – RM125,300; aerokit, lighter wheels; satin black wrap; only 200 units

    Proton X50 R3 launched in Malaysia – RM125,300; aerokit, lighter wheels; satin black wrap; only 200 units

    Proton today officially announced pricing for the X50 R3 20th Anniversary Edition, which was previewed back in May this year. Limited to just 200 units, the celebratory model is based on the range-topping 1.5 TGDi Flagship and retails at RM125,300 on-the-road without insurance.

    The RM12,000 premium over a regular 1.5 TGDi Flagship goes towards an accessory package which gives the R3 20th Anniversary Edition its distinctive look. Included in the package is a satin black vinyl wrap with yellow accents around the bottom portion of the vehicle as well as several R3-branded items.

    These include a bonnet stripe, an aerokit (front, rear and side skirting), a more prominent rear spoiler, 18-inch flow formed alloy wheels (2 kg lighter than stock) as well as dedicated badges and emblems on the front grille and tailgate. As seen on the concept, the brake calipers are also finished in yellow to keep with the R3 theme.

    On the inside, the headrests feature R3 embroidery and there’s an emblem located on the passenger side of the dashboard. Rounding off the package are R3 floor mats and Ionix window tinting from Rhinepro.

    Compared to the car that was previewed earlier this year, the version of the 20th Anniversary Edition being sold does not get a lowered ride height and the wheels have ‘R3’ engraved on the rim instead of a ‘Race.Rally.Research’ sticker.

    Beyond the visual enhancements, the rest of the 20th Anniversary Edition is pretty much the same as a regular X50 1.5 TGDi Flagship. The 1.5 litre turbocharged inline-three petrol engine still pumps out 177 PS and 255 Nm of torque, with drive sent to the front wheels via a seven-speed dual-clutch transmission.

    Our sister site paultan.org/BM was informed that around 180 bookings for the 20th Anniversary Edition during the preview, and only around 20 units are, so you’d better hurry. Deliveries of the celebratory model are scheduled to begin as a soon as next month, and if you want to see it up close, it’s currently on display at the ‘Unleash Your Imagination Carnival’ happening at the Proton Centre of Excellence this weekend.

     
     
  • Proton X50 (2020-2023) New & Used Car Buyer’s Guide

    Proton X50 (2020-2023) New & Used Car Buyer’s Guide

    First launched in 2020, the Proton X50 is a B-segment SUV based on the Geely Binyue. It is the second model that Proton launched as part of a cooperation with its shareholder Geely.

    The Proton X50, in all its variants, presents a modern, sporty, and distinctive exterior that should appeal to a wide range of buyers. If you’re considering buying one, what should you look for when buying a used or new Proton X50? Here’s a guide to help you with your purchase.

    Proton X50 Exterior

    At the front of the X50, you’ll find Proton’s signature “Infinite Weave” grille, surrounded by a striking Auburn Red strip that frames the roundel badge. This design is further accented by sharp LED headlights, large air intakes, and a front spoiler that seamlessly transitions into the black plastic body cladding. The only variant not equipped with LED fog lights in the corner inlets is the base Standard model.

    The X50’s rear design features trapezoidal LED tail lights with triple light guides, complemented by a full-width chrome strip carrying the Proton script. The car’s sporty look is further emphasized by the massive diffuser and four genuine exhaust pipes. Unlike other markets, the design team opted not to include an ostentatious rear wing, keeping the overall look sleek and modern.

    The range-topping Flagship variant is distinguished by a two-tone exterior, featuring a black roof and black side mirror caps. The careful design ensures that the joint of the A-pillar lines up neatly with the bonnet, making the two-tone colour scheme look less like an afterthought. It also comes with the TGDi badging on the sides, signifying the more powerful engine exclusive to this variant.

    Proton X50 Interior

    Proton X50 (2020-2023) New & Used Car Buyer’s Guide

    The Proton X50 SUV boasts a modern and minimalist interior design inspired by jet fighters, featuring a dashboard with faux stitching, metal-look trim, a tall center console, and jet fighter-inspired air vents.

    There is also ample storage space under the center console, equipped with a USB port and a 12-volt socket. Premium and Flagship models further enhance the visual appeal with a full red-and-black color scheme and soft-touch materials on the dashboard and front door panels.

    The SUV comes equipped with the latest version of the Geely Key User Interface, GKUI 19, which is more responsive than its predecessor. It features a redesigned interface with cleaner tiles and permanent menu buttons. The Standard and Executive models have an eight-inch touchscreen and an analog instrument cluster, while the Premium and Flagship models boast a larger 10.25-inch display and a seven-inch digital instrument cluster.

    Lastly, an integrated eSIM connects the car to the Proton Link smartphone app, allowing users to remotely check the vehicle’s status and control certain functions, including starting the car. This feature adds a layer of convenience for the user.

    Proton X50 Specs and Pricing

    Here’s a comparison of the four models of the Proton X50:

    Standard – price RM79,200 at launch, now RM86,300

    • 1.5 litre three-cylinder turbocharged engine with multi-point fuel injection, 150 PS (147 hp) at 5,500 rpm, and 226 Nm between 1,500 to 4,000 rpm.
    • Seven-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission.
    • Four airbags.
    • Full LED projector headlamps, gloss black grille with red outline, lower splitter with carbon-fibre print, and silver 17-inch wheels.
    • Inside, it comes with a polyurethane steering wheel and full black fabric seat upholstery with contrast stitching.
    • Keyless entry, push-start ignition, and remote engine start.
    • Electronic parking brake with auto hold, manually-adjustable driver’s seat, four speakers, manual air-conditioning with a N95 cabin filter and dedicated rear air vents, three USB chargers and a reverse camera​.

    Executive – price RM84,800 at launch, now RM93,300

    • The same engine and transmission as the Standard model.
    • Additional front parking sensors, LED fog lamps, and an automatic function for the headlamps.
    • Inside, there’s a leather-wrapped steering wheel, full black leatherette (faux leather) upholstery, and two additional airbags.
    • Comes with a smaller eight-inch touchscreen central display that supports “Hi Proton” voice commands, online navigation through AMAP, online music streaming through Joox, Bluetooth, and smartphone connectivity, along with a reverse camera​.

    Premium – price RM93,200 at launch, now RM101,800

    • The same engine and transmission as the Standard and Executive models.
    • Additional red brake callipers, 18-inch dual-tone alloy wheels, silver-coloured roof rails, and front welcome lamps on the side mirrors.
    • Inside, it features a two-tone interior, with a lot of dark red contrast tones on the dashboard’s top panel, the door cards, and centre armrest.
    • Power adjustable driver’s seat, full digital instrument cluster, and a 10.25-inch touchscreen with additional functionalities.
    • Automatic climate control (single-zone), six speakers, tyre-pressure monitoring system, full set of cameras for the 360-degree parking camera system.
    • Auto up for all windows (the lower variants get auto down for all windows, but auto up only for the driver)​​.

    Flagship – price RM103,300 at launch, now RM113,300

    • A different 1.5 litre turbocharged three-cylinder engine with a direct-injection system, 177 PS (174 hp) at 5,000 rpm, and 255 Nm between 1,500 to 4,000 rpm.
    • The same transmission as the other models.
    • Two-tone exterior with a black roof and black side mirror caps, TGDi badging on the sides.
    • Inside, extra bits include a full panoramic sunroof with a powered sunblind cover, auto-dimming rear-view mirror, and automatic rain-sensing wipers.
    • The variant also includes an Advanced Driver Assistance System (ADAS), which includes Forward Collision Warning with Autonomous Emergency Braking (AEB) in its suite​.

    Proton X50 Fuel Efficiency

    We had a look at the Proton X50 owner reviews on CarBase.my and we estimate the Proton X50’s fuel efficiency to be approximately 10.5 litres per 100 km. That translates to about 9.5 km per litre.

    We also had a look at Fuelly data for the Proton X50. The average km per litre reported Fuelly is around 10 km per litre, which is close to the CarBase.my data.

    Proton X50 Real Owner Feedback

    Here’s a summary of some of the common pros and cons of the Proton X50 according to owner reviews on CarBase.my. If you have a Proton X50, you can submit your owner review as well.

    Pros:

    • Low NVH (Noise, Vibration, Harshness)
    • Decent power even on the non-GDI engine in the executive variant
    • Good build quality
    • Comfortable ride, suitable for all kinds of drivers and experience levels
    • Good handling and stability
    • Hi Proton (AI assistant) is more useful than initially expected by some owners
    • Relatively spacious backrow with ample leg room
    • The DCT gearbox is superb and gives a smooth acceleration
    • The exterior and interior design is appreciated by many, feels premium for the price range
    • Powerful engine, one review even claimed it as one of the most powerful SUVs in its category​

    Cons:

    • Wind noise is noticeable after around 80-100 km/h
    • Some owners experienced issues with the infotainment system crashing
    • The boot space is considered small by some owners
    • Several owners felt there are too many unnecessary warning sounds, which comes with the territory of having an ADAS safety system
    • After-sales service was criticised as having issues with spare parts
    • Some other specific issues mentioned include a headrest that is too far forward, a poor field of view from the side mirror, and rattling sounds from the dashboard and boot after a year of usage​

    The experience of owners and thus owner reviews can vary greatly based on individual preferences and experiences. Therefore, while these reviews provide some insights into the experiences of some Proton X50 owners, they may not fully reflect the experiences of all owners.

    Proton X50 Problems

    Based on research, there are a few notable problems with the Proton X50 that you should look out for when you inspect a used Proton X50 for a purchase consideration.

    Firstly, there are reports of unusual battery drain, where the battery dies and as a result the car cannot start. Although the Proton X50’s warranty is 5 years, it doesn’t cover the battery for the same period. If you are buying a certified used car from vendors such as myTukar, look at the inspection report. Under the Underbody and Under the Hood section, there will be a line item for Battery. In this case, a tested voltage above 12.25 V and age less than 1.5 years old is considered a pass.


    Source – Proton X50 whistling sound on FB

    Next, there are reports of whistling-like wind noise from the wing mirror area. This issue is said to have been fixed on newer models. We have also seen users post solutions which involve adding soundproofing material on the inside of the side mirror mount which reportedly solves the issue.

    There are also reports of rattling from the undercarriage. These is an issue that can be addressed by the service centre. Most of the time this is an easy fix, just tightening in the undercarriage. Any random noises should be able to be picked up under the Road Test Check section of a certified used car’s report.

    Finally, there are some reports of electronic parking brake failure. This would be claimable under warranty. Any issues with the brake system would be reported under the inspection report’s brake section. You can also easily test this functionality when you inspect the car.

    The experience of owners and the problems they face with their cars can greatly vary based on individual experiences. Therefore, while this list of common issues can provide some insight into potential issues you may face with the Proton X50, they may not fully reflect the experiences of all owners.

    Proton X50 Used Car Prices

    As of time of publishing (June 2023), these are the prices of a inspected and certified used Proton X50 based on a quick survey on myTukar.

    A 2022 Proton X50 flagship currently goes for around RM99k-RM100k, with mileage generally below 30,000 km. If you move to a year older at 2021, you can find price ranges from between RM97k to RM99k, with mileage ranging from as low as 21,000 km up to 58,000 km. You can find a X50 flagship for as low as RM90k for a 2020 model.

    For the lowest entry point into Proton X50 ownership possible, you can go for the Proton X50 Standard model which can be bought for RM80k for a 2022 model with mileage under 20,000 km.

    Proton X50 Used Cars in Stock

    Here’s the latest 5 Proton X50 listed on myTukar’s Certified Pre-Owned inventory.

    From RM 853 a month
    RM 77,800
    From RM 1,040 a month
    RM 94,900
    From RM 919 a month
    RM 83,900
    From RM 887 a month
    RM 80,900
    From RM 1,040 a month
    RM 94,900

    Want to read more on the Proton X50?

    We have covered the Proton X50 extensively in the past. Here are some stories you can read to learn more about the Proton X50.

    Taking delivery of my own Proton X50 – Hafriz Shah

    Hafriz Shah details his experience taking delivery of his own Proton X50 Flagship, which he bought to replace his Peugeot 208 GTi.

    Proton X50 Review – detailed look at the pros and cons

    A 60 minute long video offering a full, comprehensive review of the X50, covering all that’s good and bad on the hot B-segment SUV.

    2020 Nissan Almera Turbo vs Honda City 1.5L, Proton X50 – we compare maintenance costs up to 100k km

    We compare the maintenance costs of the Proton X50 against other common purchases in the same price range which is the Honda City and the Nissan Almera Turbo.

    2020 Proton X50 1.5T Standard – first look at the entry-level RM79,200 variant, is the base spec SUV OK?

    Should you save some money and buy the Standard version of the Proton X50 instead of going all out and buying the Flagship? We go into detail with the Standard version here.

    2020 Proton X50 versus the X70 and Honda HR-V – we compare servicing costs over five years/100,000 km

    We compare the Proton X50’s servicing costs against other SUV rivals including Proton’s very own X70, and the Honda HR-V. Note that at time of publishing this story, the new Honda HR-V had not been launched yet so this is the previous gen Honda HR-V being compared.

    Proton X50 Community Malaysia (PX50CM)

    Lastly, we recommend you check out the Proton X50 Community Malaysia Facebook Group to read what other Proton X50 owners say about their cars.
    Read The Full Story ›

     
     
  • Taking delivery of my own Proton X50 – Hafriz Shah

    It’s no secret that I booked a Proton X50 Flagship for myself – making it three new Protons in the last two years, joining the X70 Premium CBU and Iriz Standard MT. Here’s a video of me taking delivery of my new B-segment SUV, including why I bought it plus plans for mods and fixes.

    In short, I needed a replacement for my Peugeot 208 GTi, which has gone over five years. Having owned an out-of-warranty Fiat Bravo recently, it’s not an experience I’d want to go through again, let’s just leave it as that. As clichéd as it sounds, you can’t really put a price on having peace of mind. Well, actually you can – the price of a new car, that is ;)

    An SUV fits my needs as well, with a coupe already serving as my daily. While I do believe that having a two-door as your primary car makes absolute sense, the rare times that you do need rear seats or a bigger boot do come more often than you may first think. I’ve learnt it the hard way.

    Citric Orange wasn’t my first colour choice for the X50 either. I picked red at first, until I saw it in the flesh under direct sunlight. Too bright and flat, I thought, so orange became the next best choice. There’s a story behind the number plate too, which you can hear in the video above.

    So, do you think I’ve made the right decision with the X50? Let me know in the comments section below.

    GALLERY: Proton X50 1.5 TGDi Flagship

     
     
  • Proton X50 review – detailed look at the pros and cons

    Proton X50 review – detailed look at the pros and cons

    It’s no understatement that the Proton X50 is the most hyped up new car in Malaysia since perhaps the original Proton Saga itself. Question is, can it live up to all that hype? The short answer is, no. It’s far from perfect, with more than its fair share of issues and flaws.

    So here’s our full, comprehensive review of the X50, covering all that’s good and bad on the hot B-segment SUV. Be warned, however, that this video is 60 minutes long.

    This being a Proton, naturally the public eye is on it like a hawk, wanting to know every single detail, every single fault, so we are going to be extra critical of it.

    If you’ve been following this channel long enough, you’ll remember that we did the exact same thing with the current Perodua Myvi when it first came out three years ago. It’s just what we do here at paultan.org. That review, by the way, has garnered over 2.7 million views over three languages, so thank you again Malaysians for all the support.

    Other than the full 59 minute review, we also have a shorter version of this review (25 minutes long), which is easier to digest – meant for casual viewers, it still covers all the necessary details. If you’re seriously looking to buy the X50, however, I’d recommend you take the time to watch the full version above, as it details the X50’s pros and (a lot of) cons more extensively.

    I’d also like to personally apologise for being late with this review. It was my decision to hold off all car reviews on paultan.org during the CMCO, as I felt that us driving around through the travel restrictions went against the spirit of the CMCO. Car reviews can wait, I decided, and I wanted our team to set a good example of staying home, minimising driving out.

    Now that all travel restrictions have been lifted, we can finally continue doing reviews again. I’m sorry again for the delays, and the team and I will do our very best to catch up with all the latest car reviews. Thanks for sticking with us, we’ll all get through this, together.

    Do enjoy the video above, and let me know what you think of it and the Proton X50 in general in the comments section below. Thank you for watching, and Merry Christmas and happy holidays, everyone.


     
     
  • 2020 Nissan Almera Turbo vs Honda City 1.5L, Proton X50 – we compare maintenance costs up to 100k km

    2020 Nissan Almera Turbo vs Honda City 1.5L, Proton X50 – we compare maintenance costs up to 100k km

    In Malaysia, there are currently three models that are likely to be on the watchlist of most car buyers looking for a B-segment car. These include the Proton X50 and Honda City, which were launched back in October, and joined by the Nissan Almera Turbo that went on sale earlier this month.

    While the City and Almera are direct competitors, the X50 caters towards those who favour SUVs instead of sedans. Nonetheless, these are the “hot” cars in the current climate, with prices that somewhat overlap one another: Almera (RM79,906-RM91,310); X50 (RM79,200-RM103,300); City (RM74,191-RM86,561).

    Deciding between the three is largely dependant on what you prefer and your budget, but that’s not the focus of this post. Instead, we’re comparing the servicing costs of the models mentioned here, so you are well informed before putting your money down on any one of them.

    Before we begin, some disclaimers. Firstly, we’ve already made a comparison involving the City and X50 before, so the only thing new here is the addition of the Almera to the picture. Secondly, the Almera’s service interval is shorter at 7,000 km/six months, compared to the other two that have an interval of 10,000 km/six months.

    2020 Nissan Almera Turbo vs Honda City 1.5L, Proton X50 – we compare maintenance costs up to 100k km

    Given that we typically compare service costs up to 100,000 km or five years, the Almera over 98,000 km (the closest to 100,000 km) runs up to seven years, two more than the City and X50. We’ll also mention service items that are required beyond that point, or are recommended by the carmaker.

    Referring to the total maintenance cost over five years alone, the Almera is significantly cheaper than both the City and X50. The reason for this huge discrepancy is because the Almera comes with five times free service that covers parts and labour, applicable to the 7,000-, 21,000-, 35,000-, 49,000- and 63,000-km mileages.

    This isn’t offered with the other two, although they do come with five times free labour service – only applicable to the first 30,000 customers for the X50. This omits the labour cost for major services, which helps the keep ownerships cost down, as the Almera’s free service only covers engine oil changes, windscreen washer refills and cabin filter replacements.

    So, over five years, the Almera is certainly cheaper to own, but if we compare costs over mileage, things are a little different. Up to 98,000 km, the Almera is costlier to maintain compared to the City, but is still cheaper than the X50.

    2020 Nissan Almera Turbo vs Honda City 1.5L, Proton X50 – we compare maintenance costs up to 100k km

    Click to enlarge

    Both the Almera and X50 use fully-synthetic engine oil, while the City gets semi-synthetic lubricant as standard. However, Honda customers can request for fully-synthetic oil for their City, which brings up the price to RM130.80 (including drain plug gasket), to a grand total over 100,000 km/five years to RM3,830.81. Even with that, the City is still the cheapest of the lot to maintain, although by a smaller margin.

    Looking at the individual tables, the City requires fewer engine oil filter changes compared to the Almera and X50, which require a replacement at every service interval. The X50 sees its engine air filter changed the most at five times, but it’s only three times for the Almera and City, with the Nissan sedan having the lowest part price.

    Similarly, over 100,000 km, the Proton SUV requires the cabin filter to be swapped out five times, compared to four times for the Almera, and three times for the City – although the overall difference in cost is just a few ringgits.

    As for transmission oil, Nissan recommends new CVT oil every 84,000 km or 48 months, whichever comes first. Meanwhile, the X50 only replaces its DCT oil at the 90,000-km/54-month mark, whereas the City’s CVT needs new lube at the 40,000-km/24-month intervals. At a cost of RM413.75 (including the plug washer and before labour), the Almera is the priciest when it comes to transmission oil replacement, followed by the City and X50.

    Of the three cars, the Almera and X50 are powered by turbocharged three-cylinder engines, but the latter uses regular spark plugs – three of them – that are changed more frequently every 40,000 km/24 months. The Almera’s platinum spark plugs cost more, but are only changed at the 98,000-km/84-month mark, while the City uses four iridium spark plugs that are swapped out at the 100,000-km/60-month mark – the costliest out of all.

    Other notable mentions include fuel filter changes, which happen every 20,000 km for the X50, but the City only gets a new one at the 140,000-km/84-month mark, with nothing of the sort for the Almera. Nissan also recommends a coolant change for the Almera at 98,000 km/84 months, while the City does this at 200,000 km/ten years, and the X50 at 60,000 km/36 months.

    Other service items not stipulated in these tables include the Almera’s drive (serpentine) belt – the engine uses a timing chain – which Nissan recommends to be replaced (if necessary) every 28,000 km or 24 months at a cost of RM151 (including RM14 labour). Other recommended services include wheel alignment (RM30) and balancing (RM35) every 21,000 km or 12 months.

    Nissan also quotes RM387 (including RM42 labour) for front brake pads and RM412 (including RM63 labour) for rear brake shoes, although these items will only be replaced upon inspection and if deemed necessary. The City uses a timing chain and the maintenance schedule doesn’t include a drive belt, while the X50 needs a new timing (RM195.16) and drive (serpentine) belt (RM112.89) at 110,000 km/66 months.

    As usual, servicing costs are just one aspect of vehicle ownership, and there are plenty of other things to consider. General wear and tears items like tyres are a good example, which would be cheaper for the sedans mentioned that have wheel sizes ranging from 15 to 16 inches, while the X50’s alloys are between 17 to 18 inches in size.

    The braking system on the Almera and City also employ two discs at the front and drum brakes at the rear, which would be cheaper to maintain compared to the X50’s four disc brakes. There’s more, as given their differing body styles, the cost of tinting and coating is typically less for sedans, and this also extend to car washes, which is something that follows you throughout ownership. The frequency and distance of travel will also impact how much fuel you use.

    Looking at the tables, the City is indeed the cheapest of the three to maintain over 100,000 km, but there’s more to add to the conversation. Yes, if you own an Almera and use it heavily (high mileage user), you’ll be visiting the service centre more frequently given its shorter mileage service interval.

    However, if you’re the the sort that usually services your car based on the time interval (every six months, as in you drive less than 7,000/10,000 km in the time), the Almera will prove to be the cheaper to maintain by quite a margin, up to the five-year mark.

    It’s also important to keep in mind that these costs are spread out over the years, so in the end, the difference isn’t that significant. Be that as it may, it’s good to have some understanding of maintenance costs and their importance when buying a new car.

     
     
  • 2020 Proton X50 1.5T Standard – first look at the entry-level RM79,200 variant, is the base spec SUV OK?

    2020 Proton X50 1.5T Standard – first look at the entry-level RM79,200 variant, is the base spec SUV OK?

    It’s not common to be able to lay our eyes and point our camera lenses at base variants of newly-launched models. Usually, what we get to see – at the launch event and at showrooms – is the prettiest and most impressive variant, the flagship. In the Proton X50’s case, it’s literally the top 1.5 TGDi Flagship variant with all the bells and whistles.

    We tried our best to bring to you full galleries of the 1.5T Executive and 1.5T Premium, which you saw in our launch post. However, the base 1.5T Standard variant was nowhere to be found then. Curious on how the entry level RM79,200 looks like? Here’s out first look at the Standard, courtesy of reader Meyooi.

    The good news is that despite being the base model, the 1.5T Standard does not look too much like a poverty-spec car, retaining much of what’s good about the costlier variants. The eyes you see here are LED projector headlamps with LED daytime running lights, which are standard across the X50 board. With a gloss black Infinite Weave grille and red pinstripe, the top half of the Standard’s face is identical to the Flagship’s.

    Even the prominent double front lip that joins the black fender outline is present here, giving the Standard a sporty face, just like the other X50 variants. The only thing missing is the LED front fog lamps that are available on the Executive onwards – the “side intakes” are blank as a result.

    Moving to the side, the Standard rides on 17-inch silver alloys wrapped with 215/60 tyres, the same set up as the Executive. This marks the two lower variants from the Premium and Flagship, which are given 18-inch two-tone wheels, red brake calipers and roof rails. Only the Flagship gets a two-tone body with a black roof. No pics, but the rear end of the Standard is similar to the other variants, with LED tail lights, quad tail pipes and a rear spoiler.

    Overall, the exterior of the Standard looks very decent for a base model, much better than most. But inside is where the difference between it and the others are clearer. The Standard comes with fabric seats with grey contrast stitching, with leather only available from the Executive. If you’re not a fan of leather seats, this shouldn’t be an issue, and there’s a nice wavy motif on the top portion of the seat backs.

    The steering wheel is the same flat-bottomed unit found in the rest of the range – it has two spokes of buttons but no leather wrap. Again, that’s to be found on the Exec onwards. Basically, the main interior difference between the Standard and the Exec, which is RM5,600 costlier, is leather.

    Like the exterior, both Standard and Exec have a similar looking dashboard, sharing the same manual seats, manual air con, analogue meter cluster and 8.0-inch touchscreen infotainment system. The two-tone dashboard, digital meter panel and wide 10.25-inch touchscreen you see in the promotional images are for the Premium and Flagship.

    With the RM79,200 Standard and RM84,800 Executive looking really similar in and out (lack of leather might be a deal breaker for some, non issue for others), should you just save the RM5,600 and opt for the base model?

    From L-R: Cockpits of the X50 Executive and Premium

    Depends. The biggest advantage the Exec has over the Standard are the two curtain airbags that make it six in total. We were rather surprised when it was revealed that six airbags weren’t standard across the board – as it’s fast becoming a norm in the B-segment these days – and this is the main reason why we recommend the Exec as the base point. But if you almost never have any passengers, and the X50 is a purely a personal car…

    The other features that the Exec adds on are auto headlamps, the above-mentioned LED fog lamps and front parking sensors. One last thing: the Standard comes with three exterior colour options, which are Snow White, Armour Silver and Ocean Blue. If you fancy Jet Grey and Citric Orange, it has to be the Exec. Passion Red is reserved for the Premium and Flagship.

    So, what do you think of the RM79,200 Proton X50 1.5T Standard? Looks wise, I think it’s very sporty-looking for a base model, and it doesn’t take much to make it look like the X50 in the ads – upsizing the rims and wrapping the roof/A-pillars would be enough. The other main points are the airbags, fabric/leather, analogue/digital meters and size of the touchscreen.

    Here’s the variant breakdown in detail.

    2020 Proton X50 1.5T Standard – first look at the entry-level RM79,200 variant, is the base spec SUV OK?

    2020 Proton X50 1.5T Standard – RM79,200
    Gets as standard:

    Mechanicals

    • 1.5T PFI 1.5 litre engine
    • 1,477 cc multi-point injection, turbocharged three-cylinder
    • 150 PS at 5,500 rpm
    • 226 Nm from 1,500 to 4,000 rpm
    • Seven-speed wet dual-clutch automatic transmission with manual mode (no paddle shifters)
    • 6.5 litres per 100 km fuel consumption
    • Three drive modes (Normal, Eco and Sport)
    • Front-wheel drive
    • Ventilated brake discs (front), solid discs (rear)
    • Electronic parking brake with auto brake hold function
    • MacPherson strut (front), torsion beam (rear) suspension
    • 45 litre fuel tank capacity
    • 1,325 kg kerb weight

    Exterior

    • 17-inch silver alloy wheels with 215/60-profile tyres
    • LED projector headlamps
    • LED daytime running lights
    • LED tail lights
    • Gloss black grille with red outline
    • Front lower splitter with carbon-fibre print
    • Rear spoiler
    • Quad-exhaust pipes, rear diffuser with carbon-fibre print

    2020 Proton X50 1.5T Standard – first look at the entry-level RM79,200 variant, is the base spec SUV OK?

    Interior

    • Black fabric upholstery with grey contrast stitching
    • Grey headliner
    • Manual front seat adjustment
    • Manual air-conditioning
    • Urethane steering wheel with control switches
    • Standard meter instrument cluster
    • Cruise control with speed limiter
    • Keyless entry, push-button start
    • Remote engine start
    • Rear air-con vents
    • 8.0-inch touchscreen infotainment system with GKUI 19
    • Voice command, navigation, online weather foreceast/ Joox music streaming
    • 4G and WiFi, smartphone and Bluetooth connectivity
    • Four loudspeakers
    • Three USB ports (one data, two charging)
    • N95 cabin filter
    • 330 litres boot space

    Safety

    • Four airbags (front and side)
    • Electronic stability control (ESC) and traction control
    • ABS, EBD, brake assist
    • Hill hold assist, hill descent control
    • Reverse camera
    • Four rear parking sensors

    Colours

    • Snow White, Armour Silver, Ocean Blue

    2020 Proton X50 1.5T Standard – first look at the entry-level RM79,200 variant, is the base spec SUV OK?

    Click to enlarge

    2020 Proton X50 1.5T Executive – RM84,800
    Adds on:

    Mechanicals

    • 1,345 kg kerb weight

    Exterior

    • Automatic headlamps
    • Front LED fog lamps

    Interior

    • Black faux leather upholstery with grey contrast stitching
    • Leather-wrapped steering wheel with function control switches

    Safety

    • Six airbags (front, side, curtain)
    • Two front parking sensors

    Colours

    • As above, adds on Jet Grey and Citric Orange

    2020 Proton X50 1.5T Premium – RM93,200

    Adds on:

    Mechanicals

    • 1,350 kg kerb weight

    Exterior

    • 18-inch two-tone alloy wheels with 215/55-profile tyres
    • Red-coloured brake callipers
    • Silver roof rails

    Interior

    • Black and red faux leather upholstery with red contrast stitching
    • Black headliner
    • Dual-tone black and red interior
    • Six-way powered driver’s seat
    • Single-zone auto air-conditioning
    • 7.0-inch digital instrument display
    • Front side mirror welcome lamps
    • 10.25-inch touchscreen infotainment unit
    • Additional voice functions for GKUI 19 interface
    • Six loudspeakers
    • Proton Link App compatibility (vehicle status, remote control)

    Safety

    • Tyre pressure monitoring system
    • 360-degree camera

    Colours

    • As above, adds on Passion Red

    2020 Proton X50 1.5 TGDi Flagship – RM103,300

    Adds on:

    Mechanicals

    • 1.5 TGDi 1.5 litre engine
    • 1,477 cc direct-injection, turbocharged three-cylinder
    • 177 PS at 5,500 rpm
    • 255 Nm from 1,500 to 4,000 rpm
    • 0-100 km/h in 7.9 seconds
    • 6.4 litres per 100 km fuel consumption
    • 1,370 kg kerb weight

    Exterior

    • Dual-tone exterior (black roof and pillars)
    • Automatic rain-sensing wipers

    Interior

    • Panoramic sunroof, powered sunblind cover
    • Automatic dimming rear-view mirror

    Safety

    • Forward Collision Warning (FCW) with Autonomous Emergency Braking (AEB)
    • Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) with Stop & Go function
    • Intelligent Cruise Control (ICC)
    • Lane Keep Assist (LKA)
    • Lane Departure Warning (LDW)
    • Blind Spot Information System (BLIS)
    • Intelligent high-beam control
    • Auto Park Assist
    • Four front parking sensors

    GALLERY: Proton X50 1.5T Standard


    GALLERY: Proton X50 1.5T Executive
    GALLERY: Proton X50 1.5T Premium
    GALLERY: Proton X50 1.5 TGDi Flagship
    GALLERY: Proton X50 official photos

     
     
  • 2020 Proton X50 versus Honda City 1.5L – we compare servicing costs of both over five years/100,000 km

    2020 Proton X50 versus Honda City 1.5L – we compare servicing costs of both over five years/100,000 km

    We’ve reported on the servicing costs for several models in the past, and here’s another one. This time, we’re comparing the Proton X50 and Honda City, not because they directly compete against each other, but because they are popular choices among car buyers in the market for a B-segment model, and somewhat overlap in terms of pricing – X50 (RM79,200-RM103,300); City (RM74,191-RM86,561).

    So, if you’re looking for a comparison where the X50 is put up against something from the compact SUV segment, head over here instead. However, if you’re curious about the servicing costs of the two most popular SUV and sedan nameplates in the Malaysian B-segment market currently, read on.

    Before we proceed, there’s some housekeeping in order. Firstly, all the data you see here is available from the official websites of Proton and Honda Malaysia. Secondly, we’re comparing the X50, which has the same service schedule for both its 1.5 litre turbo three-pot engines, to the City with the new 1.5 litre naturally-aspirated DOHC i-VTEC engine.

    Thirdly, we couldn’t include the newly-priced Nissan Almera – another hot B-segment model – into the comparison, because the Almera’s service schedule is not readily available (yet). Lastly, our tables only go up to five years or 100,000 km, but we will mention items that are required beyond that point.

    2020 Proton X50 versus Honda City 1.5L – we compare servicing costs of both over five years/100,000 km

    Looking at the overall figures, the City 1.5L is cheaper to maintain when compared to the X50, but only by RM657.24 over five years/100,000 km. This is the same story when compared on a year-to-year basis, as the sedan has significantly lower servicing costs from year one to four, although it does get close in the fifth year.

    It should be noted that the X50 uses fully-synthetic engine oil, while the City gets semi-synthetic lubricant by default. Should you request for fully-synthetic oil for your City, the price goes up from RM114.69 per change (includes drain plug gasket) to RM130.80, which brings the grand total over five years/100,000 km to RM3,830.81. This is still cheaper than the X50, but by a smaller delta of RM496.14.

    Referring to the individual tables, we can see that the City requires fewer engine oil filter changes, as this happens every 20,000 km compared to the X50 that needs a new one every 10,000 km. The same can be said of the air and cabin filters, which may cost more each time for the City, but is still cheaper across five years/100,000 km.

    2020 Proton X50 versus Honda City 1.5L – we compare servicing costs of both over five years/100,000 km

    Click to enlarge

    Meanwhile, the X50 only replaces its DCT oil at the 90,000-km mark, whereas the City’s CVT needs new lube at the 40,000 km intervals. Additionally, the X50 uses just three regular spark plugs, which may need to be changed more frequently – every 40,000 km – but are still cheaper overall compared to the City that requires four new iridium spark plugs at the 100,000-km mark.

    Other notable mentions include fuel filter changes, which happen every 20,000 km for the X50, but the City only gets a new one at the 140,000-km mark. Honda also recommends a coolant change for the City after 10 years/200,000 km, while the X50 undergoes this service at the 60,000-km mark. Still on the topic of service items required beyond five years/100,000 km, the X50 needs a new timing (RM195.16) and drive (serpentine) belt (RM112.89) at 110,000 km – the City uses a timing chain instead.

    Proton currently offers five times free service labour for the first 30,000 X50 customers, but Honda offers the same benefit as standard to all City customers. As you can see, the free labour is applied on specific servicing appointments with both models, mainly those with more items than others to help keep costs of ownership down.

    Of course, servicing costs are just one aspect of vehicle ownership, and there are plenty of other things to consider. Given their differing body styles, the cost of tinting and coating is typically less for sedans, and this also extend to car washes, which is something that follows you throughout ownership.

    There’s also the matter of general wear and tear items like tyres, which would be cheaper for the City, as the sedan uses smaller wheels ranging from 15 to 16 inches, while the X50’s alloys are 17 to 18 inches in size, depending on variant. Moreover, the X50 has disc brakes at all four corners, which are costlier to maintain compared to the City’s braking system that consists of two discs at the front, and drum brakes at the rear. How much fuel you use is also highly dependent on how frequent and far you drive.

    The tables do show that the City will be the cheaper of the two to maintain, likely with lower wear and tear costs too. Of course, all costs are spread out over the years, so in the end, the difference isn’t that significant. It’s just a good reminder to think of maintenance costs too when buying a new car.

     
     
  • 2020 Proton X50 versus the X70 and Honda HR-V – we compare servicing costs over five years/100,000 km

    2020 Proton X50 versus the X70 and Honda HR-V – we compare servicing costs over five years/100,000 km

    The Proton X50 was recently launched in Malaysia, where it is offered in four variants – Standard, Executive, Premium and Flagship – with pricing from RM79,200 to RM103,300. If you’re curious about the new B-segment SUV, do check out our comprehensive launch report and spec-by-spec variant breakdown posts, which are part of our X50 info hub.

    UPDATE: The costs of the X50’s timing and drive belts that are changed at the 110,000-km/66-month mark have been added.

    In this post, we’re discussing service maintenance, an aspect that is sometimes overlooked as compared to the car’s initial purchase price. Here, we’re listing the X50’s maintenance schedule over five years or 100,000 km, and comparing it to the X70 as well as the Honda HR-V – a lot of customers are choosing between the two Proton SUVs, and the HR-V is a direct rival to the X50 and a highly popular model in the compact SUV segment.

    Based on the overall figures, the X50 (service costs are the same between the 1.5T and 1.5TDGi models) is cheaper than X70 to maintain over five years or 100,000 km, although the difference is only by a few hundred ringgits. However, it is the HR-V that is the cheapest to maintain, with a grand total of RM3,874.45 compared to the X50’s RM4,326.95. Mind you, that’s a difference of RM452.50, paid over five years, so don’t be alarmed. See the tables below for the specifics.

    2020 Proton X50 versus the X70 and Honda HR-V – we compare servicing costs over five years/100,000 km

    Click to enlarge

    Going into detail, we can see that the cost of engine oil for the X50 (RM162.50/service) falls in between what goes into the X70 (RM190) and HR-V (RM88.49), making up the majority of the difference in the grand totals. Engine oil changes, along with the drain plug gasket, are mandatory changes every 10,000 km for all three – the Protons also requires an oil change at the 1,000 km/1 month-mark, but this comes free. Do note that the X50 and X70 are powered by turbocharged engines, while the HR-V uses a naturally-aspirated mill.

    UPDATE: It has come to our attention that Honda quotes the use of semi-synthetic engine oil in its standard service schedule below. Fully-synthetic oil is available as an upgrade (at RM145 per service, in place of RM88.49), and is highly recommended for 10,000 km service intervals. If a user opts for the upgrade at each service, the HR-V’s grand total goes up to RM4,598.79, which is marginally more than the X50. Proton uses fully-synthetic oil as standard.

    In the case of transmission oil, the Proton SUVs feature a seven-speed wet dual-clutch that needs new fluids at the 90,000-km mark for RM237.36. The HR-V uses a CVT, and it sees oil changes every 40,000 km at RM127.17, which over five years, costs similar to the X50 and X70.

    Engine air filter changes on the Proton SUVs are done every 10,000 km, while the HR-V only requires this service every 30,000 km. Despite the frequency difference, the cost of changing engine air filters is still higher with the Honda model over five years. The cabin filter is also more expensive for the HR-V (RM103) compared to the N95 units in the X50 (RM69) and X70 (RM64.17), with five changes required over five years for all three.

    2020 Proton X50 versus the X70 and Honda HR-V – we compare servicing costs over five years/100,000 km

    Click to enlarge

    As for the fuel filter, the X50 requires a change every 20,000 km at RM57.07 a pop, or RM285.35 over five years. This is considerably more than the X70 (RM140.85) and just above the HR-V that requires just one replacement at the 80,000-km mark for RM243.24.

    When it comes to spark plugs, the X50 and X70 use normal ones that are less expensive, with the former requiring a set of three for its 1.5 litre turbo three-cylinder engine (every 40,000 km, RM96.84 each time), while the X70’s 1.8 litre turbo-four motor uses four spark plugs (every 20,000 km, RM112.32 each time). Over five years, the cost of X50 spark plugs is cheapest (RM193.68) compared to the X70 (RM561.60), with the HR-V requiring a new set of four iridium spark plugs at the 100,000-km mark (RM438.43).

    Proton also includes a radiator coolant change at the 60,000-km mark for its SUVs (around RM135), but Honda’s maintenance schedule states this is only needed at 200,000 km (RM111.54). The HR-V also requires one less brake fluid change than the Proton SUVs, bringing down maintenance costs.

    A service item that isn’t listed for the X70 and HR-V is the timing belt, but that’s because both models use a timing chain instead. This isn’t the case for the X50 that uses a timing belt, which requires an inspection at 100,000 km and a replacement at 110,000 km/66 months. The timing belt for the X50 costs RM195.16, while the drive (or serpentine) belt that is also changed together is RM112.89 – the labour for both is RM150. All in, the total cost of this service, including the regular 10,000-km engine oil change and engine air filter, is RM825.27.

    On a year-to-year basis, the HR-V is cheaper to maintain from year one to three, although it gets costlier in year four and five as “big” ticket items like fuel filter and iridium spark plug changes are required. Keep in mind that beyond scheduled services, the actual cost of ownership also includes fuel, which is highly dependent on how frequent and far you drive.

    Additionally, wear and tear items like brakes and tyres are not part of this service menu, and they can differ greatly in price. Depending on variant, the X50 and HR-V have wheel sizes ranging from 17 to 18 inches, while the X70’s options go up to 19 inches on the top variants, which are going to be far more expensive to replace.

    All in all, based on official numbers the HR-V is the cheapest to maintain over five years compared to Proton’s SUVs (with standard semi-synthetic engine oil, at least – see update above), continuing the trend that we first saw when comparing the service costs of the X70 and CR-V previously. On the same topic, cheaper Proton models are still generally slightly less expensive to run compared to equivalent Perodua models (Saga vs Bezza, Persona vs Bezza, Exora RC vs Alza).

     
     
  • Proton X50 – electric powered tailgate available in official Urban and Utility accessories packs, fr. RM3.3k

    Proton X50 – electric powered tailgate available in official Urban and Utility accessories packs, fr. RM3.3k

    There’s no doubting that the just-launched Proton X50 is pretty well specified, even from the Standard base model on, and such is the spread of kit across the four available variants that most bases should be covered. But like with everything else, there’s always room for more, especially so if it’s something that will be useful to have on a daily basis, like an electric powered tailgate.

    The automaker is making this item available as an optional accessory, and has specified its availability in two accessories packages revealed for the X50. The first is in an Urban package, which groups the powered tailgate assembly with three other items, in this case a built-in SmartTag reader, a magnetic sun shade set and PVC coil mats. The package is priced at RM3,500.

    The other is called an Utility package, where the powered tailgate is lumped together with PVC embossed mats, a boot tray and door scuff plates. The pack is slightly cheaper, at RM3,300.

    Proton X50 – electric powered tailgate available in official Urban and Utility accessories packs, fr. RM3.3k

    Internal memo that is circulating online.

    It’s evident from the pricing of both packages that the bulk of the cost is from the powered tailgate unit, which cannot be purchased independently at this point. Fitment of the unit, we were informed, will be carried out by the dealer. Do note, however, that unlike the one fitted on the X70, the powered tailgate here does not include a kick sensor.

    Note that these packages are officially available as an optional extra, and are not by any means compulsory to all X50 buyers. This has been confirmed to us by Proton itself, so if your SA or dealer claims that the packages are compulsory, you now know that is not the case.

     
     
  • Proton X50 specs compared to the X70, Honda HR-V, Toyota C-HR, Mazda CX-3, CX-30 and other SUVs

    Proton X50 specs compared to the X70, Honda HR-V, Toyota C-HR, Mazda CX-3, CX-30 and other SUVs

    Proton today launched the new X50, which is undoubtedly one of the most anticipated cars of 2020. With four variants available and pricing from RM79,200 to RM103,300, there’s quite a lot of appeal to be had here given the specifications on show.

    So, how does the X50 stack up against mainstream B- and C-segment SUVs that are currently available or set to go on sale in Malaysia – namely the Proton X70, Honda HR-V, Toyota C-HR, Mazda CX-3 and CX-30, Subaru XV, Kia Seltos and Hyundai Kona? Well, we’ve compiled the data and arranged them neatly in table form for your consideration.

    Before proceeding, there’s a bit of housekeeping in order. We’re only listing the top-spec variant available for each model, which is what many car buyers would look at first as the range-topper is typically the one with the best possible equipment. In the case of the X50, that would be the Flagship, with the rest being as what you see in the table.

    Pricing-wise, the X50 Flagship is the least expensive of the bunch for now, barring official pricing for the Kia Seltos and Hyundai Kona. Both Korean models have yet to be launched here, although the latter is set to arrive later this week.

    Proton X50 specs compared to the X70, Honda HR-V, Toyota C-HR, Mazda CX-3, CX-30 and other SUVs

    In terms of engine output, the X50 Flagship’s 1.5 litre turbocharged and direct-injected three-cylinder makes 175 hp and 255 Nm of torque, which is less than the X70 that packs a larger-capacity 1.8 litre turbo four-cylinder with 181 hp and 300 Nm.

    However, when compared to other SUVs listed, the B-segment Proton model commands quite an advantage, although the Kona’s 1.6 litre turbo engine does put up a close fight with its 175 hp and 265 Nm. The X50, X70 and Kona all sport seven-speed dual-clutch transmissions – the Proton models use a wet type unit – with all others being either a six-speed automatic or CVT. All-wheel drive is also a rarity, with nearly all listed variants being front-wheel drive only.

    Looking at dimensions, the X50 measures 4,330 mm long and has a wheelbase of 2,600 mm, placing it within touching distance of the Honda HR-V (4,334 mm long, 2,610 mm wheelbase), which has been considered the benchmark B-SUV for the longest time.

    The X50’s figures also make it close in size to the upcoming Seltos (4,315 mm long, 2,610 mm wheelbase), while the wheelbase matches that of the Kona, which is shorter in length at 4,165 mm. Compared to the X70, Subaru XV, Toyota C-HR, Mazda CX-30, the X50 is undoubtedly smaller, but it still manages to eclipse the Mazda CX-3 (4,275 mm long, 2,570 mm wheelbase).

    As for equipment, the X50 Flagship and X70 Premium X both stand out by having a 360-degree camera as standard, along with a panoramic sunroof. The former is not offered on any of the other SUVs listed, while the latter is only for the front with the CX-30.

    The X50, X70 and CX-30 are the only ones with a LCD digital instrument cluster, with others having primarily analogue dials and an accompanying multi-info display. Additionally, while automatic air-conditioning is found on all variants – single- or dual-zone – rear vents are only found on three models mentioned in this paragraph.

    On entertainment functions, Android Auto and Apple CarPlay support is not found on any Proton SUV or the HR-V, but there is a screen mirroring function available as an alternative. If you want AA or AC, only the C-HR, CX-30, Seltos and Kona have them direct from the factory, while CX-3 owners can purchase an retrofit kit – the XV’s head unit is basic.

    Of course, one of the biggest selling points of the X50 Flagship is its safety and driver assist systems, and it certainly has plenty of them. Six airbags are standard at this level, with autonomous emergency braking, active cruise control, active lane keep assist, blind spot assist and auto high beam control all present.

    The X70, CX-30 and Kona come close, but they do not perfectly mirror the X50’s active safety suite, which is rather comprehensive. Other SUVs on the list only have a few systems as standard, or none at all, by comparison.

    All things considered, the X50 is an attractive value proposition for those in the market for a B-segment SUV. With a capable powertrain that can take on those higher up the food chain and with a compelling kit list, especially in regards to safety and driver assist systems, there’s plenty of appeal here. Thoughts?

     
     
  • FIRST LOOK: Proton X50 SUV – specs of Standard, Executive, Premium and Flagship, RM79k to RM103k

    With the Proton X50 having finally been launched, we now have full specifications, equipment and, most importantly, pricing for the national carmaker’s new B-segment SUV. You can, of course, read our comprehensive launch report and spec-by-spec breakdown, but if you’re someone who prefers to digest their news in video form, we’ve got you covered with our detailed walk-around video.

    The X50 is available in four variants, with prices starting at RM79,200 for the base Standard model. The Executive is next up at RM84,800, while the Premium retails at RM93,200. The flagship, er, Flagship tops out the range at RM103,300. All prices are on-the-road without insurance and are exempted from the sales and service tax (SST). A five-year, unlimited-mileage warranty is included.

    As you’d all have known by now, the X50 is based on the Geely Binyue/Coolray and comes with the same handsome design and futuristic interior. It also gets the latest version of the Geely Key User Interface, GKUI 19, which has a new design and is said to be more responsive compared to the one in the X70.

    The Flagship model’s Advanced Driver Assistance System (ADAS) is also more advanced than the X70’s. The new Intelligent Cruise Control (ICC) combines adaptive cruise control and lane centring assist to provide Level 2 semi-autonomous driving capabilities. There’s also the new parking assist for entry and exit, plus autonomous emergency braking, lane keeping assist and automatic high beam.

    Power comes from a 1.5 litre turbocharged three-cylinder engine in two variants. Standard, Executive and Premium models get a port-injected unit that makes 150 PS and 226 Nm of torque, delivering a fuel consumption figure of 6.5 litres per 100 km.

    The Flagship receives a direct-injected mill that pushes out 177 PS and 255 Nm, enabling it to get to 100 km/hin 7.9 seconds and achieve a fuel consumption figure of 6.4 litres per 100 km. All models are front-wheel drive and come with a seven-speed wet dual-clutch transmission.

    Those are the basics, but what exactly does each variant have and does not have, and is the circa-RM100k price of the Flagship worth the extra toys and safety features? Join our man Hafriz Shah as he gives you a closer look at the specs and equipment of every X50 variant. As usual, you can let us know what you think in the comments after the jump.

    GALLERY: Proton X50 1.5T Executive


    GALLERY: Proton X50 1.5T Premium
    GALLERY: Proton X50 1.5 TGDi Flagship
    GALLERY: Proton X50 official photos

     
     
  • 2020 Proton X50 – Standard, Executive, Premium and Flagship variants, complete spec-by-spec breakdown

    2020 Proton X50 – Standard, Executive, Premium and Flagship variants, complete spec-by-spec breakdown

    While we’ve previously compared the kit on the Proton X50 variants, the full specifications and equipment on all the four available versions haven’t been fully outlined until today with the official introduction of the SUV. Our launch report has delved into the car in great detail, but let’s take a closer look at the exact differences between the Standard, Executive, Premium and Flagship.

    Proton X50 Standard – RM79,200 OTR without insurance, with SST exemption

    This is the base model in the range, but as you’ll see in the specs list further down, the entry-level X50 is well kitted. The car wasn’t available for photos at press time, but it does look almost identical to the silver-coloured Executive seen in our live photo set here.

    Aside from the lack of front fog lamps and front parking sensors, the Standard adheres to the look of the range further afield. Styling features include full LED projector headlamps, a gloss black grille with red outline, a lower splitter with carbon-fibre print and silver 17-inch wheels with Giti tyres. At the back, the Standard gets the same rear spoiler, LED tail lights and quad-exhaust pipes, adorned with a carbon-fibre print rear diffuser.

    Inside, the variant comes with a polyurethane steering wheel and full black fabric seat upholstery with contrast stitching, and it is the only variant in the model range fitted with four airbags. These are the primary interior differences from the Executive.

    2020 Proton X50 – Standard, Executive, Premium and Flagship variants, complete spec-by-spec breakdown

    Otherwise, like with the latter, you’ll find an all-black dashboard, a traditional analogue instrument cluster with a small colour screen, cruise control, keyless entry, push-start ignition, and it even comes with remote engine start.

    Other things shared between the Standard and Executive variants include an electronic parking brake with auto hold, manually-adjustable driver’s seat, four speakers, manual air-conditioning with a N95 cabin filter and dedicated rear air vents as well as three USB chargers and a reverse camera.

    The Standard gets the same engine as the Executive and Premium, in this case a 1.5 litre three-cylinder turbocharged with multi-point fuel injection called the 1.5T PFI, designated as the 1.5L T in this application. Output for the unit is 150 PS (or 147 hp) at 5,500 rpm and 226 Nm, available from 1,500 to 4,000 rpm.

    It’s paired with a seven-speed (wet) dual-clutch automatic transmission, driving the front wheels. The gearbox, which is found across the entire X50 range, has a manual mode, but no paddle shifters, as the X50 doesn’t come with them. Three drive modes – Normal, Eco and Sport – are available.

    Proton X50 Executive – RM84,800, OTR without insurance, with SST exemption

    The X50 Executive, which is priced at RM84,200 on-the-road without insurance (with SST exemption), making it RM5,000 more than the Standard, adds on front parking sensors, LED fog lamps and an automatic function for the headlamps. Inside, there’s a leather-wrapped steering wheel, full black leatherette (faux leather) upholstery and two additional airbags to make it a count of six.

    Like the Standard, the Executive comes with a smaller eight-inch touchscreen central display. It supports “Hi Proton” voice commands, online navigation through AMAP, online music streaming through Joox. There’s also Bluetooth and smartphone connectivity, along with a reverse camera.

    Proton X50 Premium – RM93,200 OTR without insurance, with SST exemption

    Next, we come to the second-highest model in the range, and the Premium – which is priced at RM93,200 with SST exemption until December 31, 2020 – dresses the SUV further with red brake callipers and 18-inch dual-tone alloy wheels fitted with Continental UltraContact 6 tyres. The variant is also equipped with silver-coloured roof rails and front welcome lamps on the side mirrors.

    Inside, the Premium features a two-tone interior, with a lot of dark red contrast tones found on the dashboard’s top panel, the door cards and centre armrest. The leatherette upholstery for the seats also gets dressed in a two-tone scheme, complete with red contrast stitching.

    Additional kit for the variant includes a power adjustable driver’s seat and a full digital instrument cluster, complete with different themes for the three driving modes.

    The centre touchscreen also gains display acreage, and the 10.25-inch widescreen unit adds on extra functionalities for the “Hi Proton” voice commands, including that for controlling window operation. The Premium also adds on Proton Link app connectivity, where you can lock/unlock or start the car to set the air-condition on remotely via your smartphone.

    Speaking of air-conditioning, the Premium makes the shift to automatic climate control, although it’s a single-zone system. Elsewhere, the audio system’s loudspeaker count goes up from four to six, and a tyre-pressure monitoring system finds its way on. You also get a full set of cameras for the 360-degree parking camera system.

    Another change is with the window controls – you now get auto up for all windows with the Premium. The lower variants get auto down for all windows, but auto up only for the driver.

    Proton X50 Flagship – RM103,300 OTR without insurance, with SST exemption

    The Flagship is priced at RM103,300 (with SST exemption until December 31), which makes it RM10,100 more than the Premium version. While that’s quite a big gap, it’s made up by the long list of features that are exclusive to it.

    It’s the only model in the range to feature a slightly different engine – it’s still a 1.5 litre turbocharged three-pot, but one with a direct-injection system. The 1.5 litre TD mill (known as the 1.5L TGDi on the SUV) ups the output to 177 PS (or 174 hp) at 5,000 rpm and 255 Nm from 1,500 to 4,000 rpm, which is 27 PS and 29 Nm more than the 1.5 litre PFI seen on the other three variants.

    Externally, it’s easily distinguishable from the other three X50 versions by its two-tone exterior, courtesy of its black roof and black side mirror caps, and if you get close up, by its TGDi badging on the sides. Inside, extra bits are a full panoramic sunroof with a powered sunblind cover and an auto-dimming rear view mirror, as well as automatic rain-sensing wipers.

    The most significant parts are all tucked away from sight, save for an extra camera behind the windscreen and a radar mounted on the bumper. These are part of the variant’s Advanced Driver Assistance System (ADAS), which includes Forward Collision Warning with Autonomous Emergency Braking (AEB) in its suite.

    Other items in the ADAS set include Adaptive Cruise Control with Stop and Go, active lane keeping assist, lane departure warning, blind spot warning, auto high beam and auto-park assist. As previously reported, the X50 has a full five-star ASEAN NCAP crash safety rating, and this is for all four variants available, since the crash tests were carried out on the Standard.

    Finally, exterior colour options, and there are six colours to choose from. However, not all the shades are available for all the variants. The Standard can only be had in Snow White, Armour Silver and Ocean Blue, while the Executive adds on the option of Jet Grey and Citric Orange to make it five. Meanwhile, Passion Red is exclusive to the Premium and Flagship, which both get the full six colour options.

    The Proton X50 comes with a five-year unlimited mileage warranty, a free data package of 1GB per month for five years as well as three labour-free charges for servicing. At today’s launch, the company announced that it will provide free labour for five servicing schedules to buyers of the first 30,000 units. It was also revealed that prices in East Malaysia is RM2,000 more expensive across the entire model range.

    Here’s the complete specification breakdown of all four X50 variants, and you can also compare the SUV side-by-side on CarBase.my.

    2020 Proton X50 1.5T Standard – RM79,200

    2020 Proton X50 – Standard, Executive, Premium and Flagship variants, complete spec-by-spec breakdown

    Gets as standard:

    Mechanicals

    • 1.5T PFI 1.5 litre engine
    • 1,477 cc multi-point injection, turbocharged three-cylinder
    • 150 PS (or 147 hp) at 5,500 rpm
    • 226 Nm from 1,500 to 4,000 rpm
    • Seven-speed (wet) dual-clutch automatic transmission with manual mode (no paddle shifters)
    • Three drive modes (Normal, Eco and Sport)
    • Front-wheel drive
    • Ventilated brake discs (front), solid discs (rear)
    • Electronic parking brake with auto brake hold function
    • MacPherson strut (front), torsion beam (rear) suspension
    • 45 litre fuel tank capacity
    • 6.5 litres per 100 km fuel consumption
    • 1,325 kg kerb weight

    Exterior

    • 17-inch alloy wheels (silver) with 215/60 profile tyres
    • LED projector headlamps
    • LED daytime running lights
    • LED tail lights
    • Gloss black grille with red outline
    • Front lower splitter with carbon-fibre print
    • Rear spoiler
    • Quad-exhaust pipes, rear diffuser with carbon-fibre print

    Interior

    • Black fabric upholstery with grey contrast stitching
    • Grey headliner
    • Manual front seat adjustment
    • Manual air-conditioning
    • Urethane steering wheel with control switches
    • Standard meter instrument cluster
    • Cruise control with speed limiter
    • Keyless entry, push-start ignition
    • Remote engine start
    • Rear air-con vents
    • Eight-inch (8.0) touchscreen infotainment system with GKUI 19
    • Voice command, navigation, online weather foreceast/ Joox music streaming
    • 4G and WiFi, smartphone and Bluetooth connectivity
    • Four loudspeakers
    • Three USB ports (one data, two charging)
    • N95 cabin filter
    • 330 litres boot space

    Safety

    • Four airbags (front and side)
    • Electronic stability control (ESC) and traction control
    • ABS, EBD, brake assist
    • Hill hold assist, hill descent control
    • Reverse camera
    • Four rear parking sensors

    Colours

    • Snow White, Armour Silver, Ocean Blue

    2020 Proton X50 1.5T Executive – RM84,800

    2020 Proton X50 – Standard, Executive, Premium and Flagship variants, complete spec-by-spec breakdown

    Adds on:

    Mechanicals

    • 1,345 kg kerb weight

    Exterior

    • Automatic headlamps
    • Front LED fog lamps

    Interior

    • Black leatherette faux leather upholstery with grey contrast stitching
    • Leather-wrapped steering wheel with function control switches

    Safety

    • Six airbags (front, side, curtain)
    • Two front parking sensors

    Colours

    • As above, adds on Jet Grey and Citric Orange

    2020 Proton X50 1.5T Premium – RM93,200

    2020 Proton X50 – Standard, Executive, Premium and Flagship variants, complete spec-by-spec breakdown

    Adds on:

    Mechanicals

    • 1,350 kg kerb weight

    Exterior

    • 18-inch alloy wheels (dual-tone) with 215/55 profile tyres
    • Red-coloured brake callipers
    • Roof rails (silver)
  • Front side mirror welcome lamps
  • Interior

    • Black and red leatherette faux leather upholstery with red contrast stitching
    • Black headliner
    • Dual-tone black and red interior
    • Six-way powered driver’s seat
    • Single-zone auto air-conditioning
    • Full-colour LCD digital instrument cluster
    • 10.25-inch touchscreen infotainment unit
    • Additional voice functions for GKUI 19 interface
    • Two additional tweeters, total six loudspeakers
    • Proton Link App compatibility (vehicle status, remote control)

    Safety

    • Tyre pressure monitoring system
    • 360-degree camera

    Colours

    • As above, adds on Passion Red

    2020 Proton X50 1.5 TGDi Flagship – RM103,300

    2020 Proton X50 – Standard, Executive, Premium and Flagship variants, complete spec-by-spec breakdown